Toddler Activities


Oh, the creativity begins!  Keeping these mobile explorers exploring the right things and not getting into too many of the wrong ones is a challenge!  Attention span plays a part too. Try these activities with your toddler to engage them in developmentally appropriate learning time. Click on the title of each activity to read the full description.

This page was included by Healthline.com on their list of the 
Top Sites for Toddler Activities!

(For more information about Toddlers, 
check out this post: Crash Course in Child Development: Toddlers.)



Oats and Salt Sensory Bin
Part of the 40 Days of Sensory Bin Fillers Series. I include some quick tips for using sensory experiences indoors.

Homemade Summer Fun with Kids
Simple ways to play indoors or out with kids in the Summer time.

Use up old play dough by making a simple puzzle.

Use left over stickers to create a simple, quick shape and letter identification game for older toddlers. 

Here are two songs that I start singing to my children before they are even toddlers. They helped my children learn to spell their names and count before they were even 2. 

Fine Motor Play with Pasta and Play Dough
Combine play dough and dry pasta for a sensory and fine motor experience of varying textures. 

Learn Animal Names with Animal Nametags
How can you add some literacy into your child's play with toy animals? Make the animals name tags! Really simple and fun to expose them to reading. 

Cardboard tube apple trees and 7 activities that use them for learning-not all the activities are for toddlers, but I have a few, so check this one out if you have toddlers, preschoolers OR young elementary kids.

1) Dump and Put:
Toddlers love to dump bins of toys all over the floor, but they love to 'put' things in containers as well. Why not make a game of it? 


I store toys separated by 'type' in fabric bins so that they are easy to locate when my son wants to play with them, and easy to put away when he is done. I also started having him learn to put things away when he could sit up and put toys in containers. He had one bin and a few toys that were his responsibility and he liked putting them back in the box. Of course, sometimes he would dump them back out, but it was the practice that counted! 

I can't say it makes him 'want' to clean up, but when he has to do it, he does. If you try this at times other than just clean up, it will be a game rather than the end to play. 


2) Oats, peas, beans and barley grow:

One of the main learning experiences in a daycare is the sensory table.  It is always a busy center.  Make one at home!  Children love playing with uncooked rice, uncooked beans, dry noodles, dry rolled oats, etc.  They can get their hands in it, sharpen their fine motor skills by picking pieces up, and they can measure, scoop, and pour.  I have dry beans, and an old set of measuring cups for my son to play with.  Of course you can only use this with toddlers who are not putting things in their mouth since this is a choking hazard for children still in an oral stage.

My son scoops and pours with the measuring cups.  They are 'nesting cups' in reality, but better since they have the measurement listed on them so this can be a math game as well.  Let your child explore it.  I usually set it up on our deck or in the yard so that any mess can be eaten by the birds.  (Bird seed is an option as well.)


Other items we have used in my classrooms are water, snow, water and dish soap, water and food coloring (be careful with clothes), shredded paper, and sand.


3) Dance and move to music

Turn on a kids' CD, or one of those Toddler channels on the television music channels.  Expose your child to music.  They will move and play. Sing and dance with them.  Get the wiggles out!  It teaches them not only gross motor movements as they move and dance, but also language and listening skills as they listen to the words and sing along. (Add a scarf or ribbon so your child can wave it around and dance with it to add an extension.) For some personalized songs that teach, check out this post.

4) The child went over the mountain


Pile up a few couch or bed pillows. Have your toddler try climbing over them.  If your toddler is anything like mine was, any opportunity to climb over something is fun.  A bean bag would work for this, or even a big blanket folded up.   You can add pillows or blankets to the stack depending on your child's skill level, height, etc.  Be careful for any falls or slips into a hard floor below the 'mountain.' This is a good opportunity to teach your child to keep their head up and be careful for the floor below.

5) What animal is that?

Print off some images of animals, paste them on a piece of cardstock or poster board, and label them with their name: cow, goat, pig, dog, etc.  Show your child the poster, and teach them the names of the animals while pointing to each picture.  Make the animal sounds as well.  

Print throughout their environment will help emphasize early language development, and its importance.  Hang the poster on a wall or the refrigerator at your child's height.  You can use this to 'quiz' your child as their langauge skills develop and they are able to make the animal sounds or point to each and say the names.


6)Make a puzzle

A) Save an empty cereal box or frozen waffle box (or other food box that is a favorite 'eat' of your child).

B) Cut the box into simple geometric shapes for younger children. (I draw the design that I will cut out on the back of the image and use it as my cutting guide.)  The greater the number of pieces, the smaller they will be, and the more difficult the puzzle.  Ease in younger children and challenge the older ones!

C) Give the puzzle to your child to put together.

They will have so much fun seeing their own face if you use a personal photo.  You can include your child in the creation process so that they see this project from start to finish, or surprise them with it: a new, free, toy!

This activity is great, because store-bought puzzle pieces get lost, or damaged.  I try to give puzzles a long life even if pieces are not pristine, but this project allows you to create new puzzles almost instantly if others get too shabby to keep!  You can print a few images that coincide with your child's newest interest (cartoon characters, cars, horses, frogs, etc.)  It's a very versatile activity and can be personalized for each child's interests.

7) Bat at the Ball
Tie a string, or piece of yarn, to a beach ball or balloon.  Fasten the end of the string to the top of a doorway, the ceiling, or outside on a shepherd's hook.  The string should be long enough to allow your toddler to just reach the ball while they are standing up.  The goal is to have your child bat at the ball while maintaining balance.  Great for the early walkers who still need to work on balance.  Also, for older toddlers, you can shorten the string so they have to reach higher (again, extending the balance challenge) or jump up to tap the ball which helps them learn to jump as well.

8) Bubbles
This is easy.  Blow bubbles and encourage your child to 'catch' the bubbles (eye-hand coordination, and gross motor movement).  To extend this activity, count the bubbles out loud as your child "catches" them to expose your child to number order.  

You can let your child try to blow the bubbles as well.


9) Towel Tube Bowling
Using paper towel tubes or toilet paper tubes, line them up on the floor in a bowling arrangement.  Demonstrate to your child how to roll the ball at the tubes to knock them over.  Count how many are 'down'. We made a bowling mat from a yoga mat for some additional bowling fun. Check it out here. It is at #14.

10) Sock Sort
Sorting is an important skill for young children.  It helps strengthen visual discrimination skills, compare and contrast, and is a pre-math skill that will help build on the later need to group numbers.  Try this one on laundry day:  As you fold the clothes, set aside the socks.  Ask your child to help find the match for each sock.  You may have to help at first, or start with 2 pairs versus 10, but this is a great way to initiate help with the household chores and make a learning game out of it.

11) Sock Toss 
Once the socks are folded/tucked, use them as soft 'balls' for a tossing activity.  Using the laundry basket or a small box, demonstrate to your child how to toss the sock ball into the basket.  Let them try it.  Be patient, they may walk to the basket and just drop in the sock!  This is an easy activity to pull out and put away when the playing is done.

12) Table Top Tape Removal
Using masking tape, place long strip of tape on the fridge door, table top, sliding glass door or a window that is within your toddler's reach.  Criss cross the strips of tape until you have about 5 strips stuck to the surface.  Demonstrate to your child how to use their finger/nail to pick at the tape and pull it off.  This is a challenge to the younger toddler, and is great exercise for the fine motor skill of using the fingers.

13) Rip It Up
Give your toddler a piece of the newspaper, scrap advertisement, or other scrap paper and let them rip it apart.  Toddlers are at an age where things are not going in their mouths as often as infants, and it takes coordination and fine motor movement to rip the paper into long strips and even smaller pieces.  Let them help clean it up when they are done by counting the pieces as you put them in the recycling box...or save them and expose your child to gluing (with your help) and make the scraps into a collage.  You can place a dot of glue on a piece of paper and your child can put the paper scrap onto the glue.  Teamwork!

14) Natural Materials Feely Box
If you have collected rocks, leaves, pine cones, shells, or any other larger natural materials from playtime outside, bring them inside and create a feely box.  Place collected items (related, or not) in a small cardboard box, cloth bag, or other receptacle.  Show them to your baby, and let them reach into the box or bag to pull out items and feel them.  If you are worried about the cleanliness of the items, hand wash them prior to use.  Make sure to talk about the items with your child to expand vocabulary and exposure to language.

15) Color Circles Sticker Sort
The older toddler will have fun sorting the colored stickers into color groups.  Grab a package of the 4-color circle stickers from an office supply store.  Divide a piece of paper into 4 spaces as shown in the picture.  Using colored markers, write the color words using their respective colored marker writing one color per square. Hand one sticker at a time to your child and say the color name. Help them match the sticker to its corresponding place on the paper and let them stick it on the paper. This activity teaches fine motor control, visual discrimination (the ability to discriminate between visible similarities and differences in size, shape, pattern, form, and color), and color recognition.



16) Monochromatic Duplos
 Pull out only one color of duplos and present them to your child. Talk about them using the color word.  Variations in tone are ok: learning occurs when initial confusion leads to scaffolding and deeper understanding

17) Single Letter Sticker Collage
Purchase some stickers from the dollar aisle at Target, or at your local Dollar Store and help your child use only the letter of their first name and stick them on paper.  Stickers are a fine motor challenge for Todds, and this will help enhance their exposure to letters.

18) Foam Crayon Color Sort
Using sheets of craft foam in a variety of colors, cut out one large crayon shape and 4 small crayon shapes per color.  Decorate your crayons as you choose and write the color word on each one.  Have your child place the small crayons on the large crayon that matches.  Store in a zip top bag in your 'puzzles' or 'games' bin, or a plastic page sleeve in a binder.  Can be turned into a folder game as well.

19) Pom Pom Magnets Pincer Practice
I had a small collection of pom poms left over from previous craft activities, so I made a game out of them!  All you need are pom poms of various colors and a roll of magnetic strip tape (costs 5-8 dollars at your local hardware store).

1) Cut a small piece of magnet tape, peel off the paper backing and stick onto the pom pom well. Repeat for the other pom poms.

2) Arrange on a small cookie sheet or metal pan, or even the refrigerator. Let your child explore trying to grab the pom poms with their pincer grasp. (This is challenging, so be patient with them.)

3) To expand for older children, using a muffin tin, line the pom poms along the edges and let your child sort them by color. I place a circle of colored construction paper in each muffin cup and then my child can use tweezers or their fingers to match the pom poms to the correct place. (It is a common activity, so there are a lot out there on the web to compare.)

20) Shredded Paper Sensory
Shredded paper is something we ALWAYS have plenty of in our paper shredder bin.  It can be used as a sensory bin material.  I hide magnets, small toys, or foam letters inside the paper shreds, and my child digs through it until she finds an item to pull out. You can make this thematic as well by using all dinosaur toys or small toy cars, as well as Easter eggs, or plastic Christmas ornaments. 



21) Awareness of Print
Your toddler CAN begin to learn about print.  Exposure to letters and words is key to starting your child off on a great footing for later reading readiness and success. Long before children can 'read' they can recognize the significance of print in their environment-the McDonalds 'M', the 'Geico' commercial, etc. This is an easy activity...SO easy...to teach your child a bit about print. 1) Tape a piece of paper to the high chair tray, or right to a table and 2) say the letters of the child's name as you write them on the paper. 3) Let your child pick a few crayons-be sure to say the color name of each-and then let your child color the paper. They are exposed to their name-and you can really use any word you choose-as well as gain fine motor experience while coloring, not to mention color association from the crayons. A toddler writing center! (I expanded this a bit at other times to include just letters-I would write 'A' and 'a' on the paper in a few places-and shapes-draw the shapes on the paper as you name them and then let your child color (scribble) away. You will be amazed how quickly he/she starts to focus on individual letters by coloring on top of the letter or shape in a more focused way.)

22) Tactile Alphabet Book
Using an alphabet board book that you may have at your house-the one in the picture was purchased for $1 at Target in the Dollar Aisle-and some puffy fabric paint, create a tactile letter exploration activity. Trace the letters on each page with the puffy paint, and let it dry based on the directions on the paint bottle. You do one page at a time-it takes about 10 seconds to do each page of a book laid out like the one in the picture, and then you just let it sit on the counter until dry enough to go on to the next page. It takes a little patience, but once completed this adds a level of interest to an ordinary ABC book. You introduce the 'shape' of each letter through the sensory exploration that is possible after the puffy paint dries.

23) Shape Hopscotch
Using a roll of butcher paper, large pieces of packing paper, or pieces of construction paper taped together to make a long piece of paper, you can create a shape hopscotch exploration...or a large coloring mural! What I did was tear off a piece of butcher paper and I drew on basic shapes and colored them in. I said the name of each shape while pointing to them when my toddler was paying attention, and she took a crayon and scribbled over the shapes. We also stood up and 'hopped' onto each shape saying the name to add a little gross motor activity to the learning as well. It eventually was torn apart, but that is fine motor and sensory play!

24) Cookie Sheet Magnet Games
I noticed my children not really paying attention to our magnetic letters that were stuck on the fridge, so I placed them on a cookie sheet (still magnetic) and placed the cookie sheet on a child-sized table. Because it was in a new place, it was unexpected and became new again! This is a great way to get your child to sit at the table to 'work' for a few minutes as well when they are needing a little more structured time. Cookie sheet+magnets=instant center! 

25) Easy Stampers
Use empty ribbon rolls, small lengths of straw, empty thread spools or toilet paper tubes as stampers for paint. Little hands can work to grip the 'stamp', dip it in paint and stamp away. Using a long piece of butcher paper taped to a table top can help a toddler's need to spread out and expand their creativity. Biscuit cutters and cookie cutters can work as well-just dip into paint and stamp. They can easily be washed in soap and water afterwards. This is a great way to explore shapes and fine motor skill exercise. (The end of a paper towel tube can be bent or shaped into different forms for more variety.)

26) Outdoor Wash Time
Place a bucket of soapy water in front of a child, and they think 'play' not 'work', so take that outside and wash the toys! My children washed their ride-on toys, but bring out the garage tools too and scrub away. This is a great rainy day activity for spending time in the garage (if you have one) cleaning up for fun...I know, it's a stretch, but try it! This really teaches care for things and team work not to mention that it combines fine motor and gross motor movements.

27) The Very Hungry Caterpillar Fruit Plates
Read the book The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. Create this matching activity to introduce or reinforce number-value exploration that matches what the caterpillar eats in the book.  Print off the free felt board pattern shapes for the fruit from Making Learning Fun (print pages 1 and 6 from the link) or draw them yourself. Color and cut out the fruit pieces and mount each group of fruit on construction paper together (all 3 plums together, all 4 strawberries together, etc.) to reinforce. I then cut around each group of fruit so that all of the same fruit was on the same piece of paper as shown in the picture with all three plums on one piece of construction paper. 

Using five paper plates, write the number symbol and the word of the fruit that illustrates that amount on the top of the plate. Punch a hole in the rim of the plate as shown above and tie a piece of yarn (about 6-8 inches long) to the hole. Also punch a hole in each fruit piece and tie the other end of the string to the fruit. Using velcro pieces or dots, place the hook side on the plate and the loop side on the back of the fruit. Hang the plates on the wall, or the window using tape. Let the fruit pieces dangle below their plate and encourage your child to place the fruit on the plate where it belongs. (You can extend this for older children by not including the string and having the child solely rely on counting to match up the fruit with its matching plate.)

28) Shave Cream Is Not Just Sensory
 I started off with a plastic mat on the floor and a cookie sheet as the surface to contain the shave cream. I drew some circles on a piece of construction paper (the red in the picture to the left) and slipped the paper into a zip top bag so that my daughter could place shave cream in each circle and try to form the circle with her fingers (sensory, geometry and fine motor). Shave cream was squirted in a big mound on the cookie sheet for her to explore on her own with her hands. I showed her how to mold the shave cream into a circle shape following the pattern in the bag, and then she tried. Eventually she just played with it between her fingers and liked to spread it around with her hands on the cookie sheet. I wrote her name on the cookie sheet with my finger and she then 'erased' it with her hands by moving the shave cream around. We 'wrote' letters, shapes, etc. to add to her exploration. A good 30 minutes went by. I did plan this activity for a day when I had to mop the floors anyway, but you could take it outside on a deck or in the yard so all you have to do is turn on the hose to clean up. The shave cream rinsed right off of the bag so I can use the circle paper again in or out of the bag. 

29 Duplo/Block Color Sort

You need: 2 paper lunch bags or other containers, colored Duplos or other colored blocks, scotch tape and a marker. Separate two colors of blocks that you would like your child to use. Cut two strips of construction paper that match the two block colors and tape one paper strip to a lunch bag or shoe box; repeat with the other paper strip on the other bag/box. I wrote the name of each color on the paper strip as well. Make a pile of the blocks and guide your child to place the colors in to the correct matching bag. The best part is, when they are done, the bags can be dumped! What toddler doesn't love to dump?

**To simplify this, use only one color and your child will place the one color of block into the one color bag. This repetition allows a younger toddler to practice learning one color at a time and still engages them in a cause-and-effect activity.




30) Toddlers and Crayons

Toddlers LOVE cause-and-effect activities. Often this is why we pull out our hair trying to chase after this age group: they are always trying out pushing and pulling and poking and prodding-sometimes in the wrong places! They do need our supervision, but it is also nice to provide toddlers with activities that engage the exploratory interest that they have at this age. I start introducing coloring with crayons when my child can grasp, so your toddler is probably ready to try to color. Toddlers don't recognize boundaries well, so small pieces of paper will result in crayon crossing the edges and getting on your table. Try taping a large piece of butcher paper or craft paper to your table or floor. (You can buy rolls of this at places like IKEA or at local discount stores for pretty cheap.)  If you don't have craft paper, lay several pieces of construction paper or scrap paper out on a surface and tape down with masking tape. Even a paper bag cut open can be a canvas for a child. I place a few crayons (2 or 3) on the paper so my child does not dump the entire box all over-too many crayons can result in distraction for this age group. Prepare the table, lay out a couple of crayons and when your toddler wants to focus, this is a great way to teach them what they CAN try.

(This is too early to try to correct an inappropriate grip while coloring. I wait until at least 3 before instructing how to hold a crayon or pencil. Let this be exploratory coloring where the lesson is color names, fine motor exercise and learning what CAN be done-coloring on paper and not on the table or floor.)

(Also, if your toddler is still putting things in their mouth, you can still introduce activities like this. Start by telling them that crayons are for coloring and not eating. If they put the crayons in their mouth, then tell them "no" and that they need to color on the paper or the crayon will be taken away. If the crayon goes in the mouth again, coloring time is done. You can revisit later that day or another day, but teaching the consequence is also a great lesson for every toddler to start learning.)

31) Touch the Textures
This little make-at-home booklet is a great exploration activity that allows your toddler to 'read' while engaging their need to touch everything! I created it from paper board that is the material in cereal boxes, but you could use cardboard as well. Cut the board into 4 inch by 6 inch pieces and punch two holes in the left side of each 'page' as shown in the picture.

 On each page, I used hot glue to attach scrap pieces of fabric, rug grip, and ribbon. After the glue cooled, I wrote a corresponding word to describe how the material on each page feels-sticky, bumpy, smooth, etc. This way print is being introduced as well for early literacy.

After all the pages were labeled, I laid the pages on top of each other with the holes lined up on the left side, and tied a piece of yarn through to bind the book. Obviously, this is great for infants or toddlers with supervision so that if they start to pull the material off of the pages, you can teach that we can touch but not tear. A great lesson that will need to be learned with the use of 'real' books as well.

 32) Pillow Path
Need an indoor activity to help utilize large muscles on a rainy day, or a day that is too cold for going outside? Try making this balance game out of pillows...yep, only pillows! Line a few pillows on the floor-placing them on carpeted surfaces or rugs will help reduce the risk of slipping, but supervision is key when introducing any new activity to your child!

Once you have made the path, show your toddler how to step on the pillows to walk along them. You will notice how much balance is tested when your child attempts to walk on this cushy path. My preschooler and toddler spent about 15 minutes taking turns walking along the path. Count each pillow as you walk on it all the way to the end. Add pillows to increase the challenge.


33) Toddler Math Center
Add some math to your toddlers next coloring experience: draw numbers or shapes on their piece of paper before you offer it to them. Tell them the names of the shape or shapes, number or numbers, and then as they color on the drawn images, repeat the names: "You just colored the square red," for example. You are teaching, and exposure will help your child retain knowledge much earlier. I have even just written the letter 'E' multiple times (add a little literacy) on one piece of paper when my daughter was very interested in saying that letter. So she was able to color a bunch of 'E's and now she can identify the letter on her own. A very simple way to start teaching basic math information.


 34) Number Steps
My toddler, thanks to having an older brother, was exposed to counting early. She was already trying to count before 2 years old, so I went with it and developed activities to help expose her to the number symbols and order. Try this simple number steps activity. All you need is construction paper, a marker and masking tape.

First, cut 5 sheets of construction paper in half width-wise. Second, write one number symbol (1, 2, 3..) on each piece and write the corresponding number word under each symbol, again, only one number per piece of paper. Using tape, attach the pieces of paper to your floor in order. While holding your child's hand, step together onto '1' and be sure to say, "one". Then step to '2' and so on. Toddlers like to move, so this way they are stepping and learning numbers at the same time. I left these on the floor (in a high traffic area) for a whole day and we revisited the activity a few times. Great for a rainy or cold day as well.



37) Environmental Print Flip Book
Children learn to "read" their environment much earlier than they learn to read words in books. They will point to stores and say the name, or see a commercial on tv and tell what company it is. I remember when my son picked up a piece of mail (at 2 years old) and said, "This says 'Geico.'" Of course I was thrilled, but it is only proof that they learn what they are exposed to, and we can encourage their attention to their environment by letting them interact with it: This (or any) environmental flip book is so simple and an easy way to encourage your child to recognize the importance of print...even in the toddler years!

What I did was cut the front off of food boxes, punch a hole in the top corner, and loop through a piece of yarn to connect all the box fronts together to make a little 'book.'  It is in my toddler's 'learning games bin' and we can pull it out and read it.  I can "test" her to see if she can tell me what they are. She might say, "noodles," instead of "linguine," but she is still 'reading' the box. (You can also cut them into shapes to make a puzzle as I posted a bit farther up on this page.)


38) Scooping Ice out of Water
It is so simple, and yet so engaging for toddlers to get their hands wet and dig into sensory activities! We use water play so often I wonder how my children do not get bored with it. This is an easy add-on: put a bunch of ice in a bucket of water. Your child may be content to just try to grab and hold the ice, but I added a slotted spoon and cup so my child could try to scoop up the ice and pour it into the cup. (Fine motor, eye-hand coordination, and motor development due to the movement of the wrist...will come in handy when it is time to cut with scissors and spread onto bread!) Adding simple tools to simple activities teach life skills.



39) Sensory Tubes
On a trip to the children's museum in our area I jotted some ideas down for activities/toys that I wanted to try to make at home. This is one: Using cardboard tubes, tape, coins, rocks, plastic wrap and a bell, I made a few sensory tubes.

Start by folding a piece of plastic wrap into a squarish-shape so it can cover one end of the tube. Tape around the edge to secure the plastic wrap.


In the other end, drop a few coins. (Each tube had different items inside: one had a Christmas bell, one had beans, one had rice.)



On the open end, I taped another piece of folded wrap to close the tube. I also wrote the word for what items were inside the tube to add some literacy.  Make a few and your child can use them as instruments and they can try to guess what is inside.

40) Painted-by-Child Color Cards

My daughter loves to paint, and I decided to save a few paintings where she had mixed two colors to help teach her color names and color words. After she made a painting using two colors, I cut out a piece of the artwork and labeled the color. I tried to cut a piece that still had remnants of the two original colors in it so that I could say, "Look, red and yellow made orange."  I labeled each color card and laminated them so I could hang them on the wall and we could refer back to them often.  Extension: Punch holes in each color card and lace them together with yarn to form a little color book!


41) Egg Carton Fine Motor Punch

All you need here is an egg carton (foam will work best), and stickers. I used the colored circle stickers from an office supply store, but some cute animal or letter stickers from the scrapbooking aisle would be great too. This activity promotes fine motor strength, one-to-one correspondence and vocabulary/communication skills. Turn the empty, clean egg carton upside down. Place one sticker on each egg cup as shown in the picture to the left.  
Your child pokes at the stickers to push in the egg cup. I introduced the activity like this: "Look! There are yellow, green and red stickers here. Let's count all the yellow stickers. Push the sticker to press it down when we count each number." I did help guide my toddler to only press one cup at a time while saying each number at a time. Your child could say the color as they press, and they can randomly press them in-no need to do each row at a time-as long as you are only saying one number when they press one egg cup, and guiding them to slow down in order to try to maintain that one-to-one correspondence.
My preschooler helped me discover that we could reuse this game by opening it up and on the inside of the carton, pressing the egg cup back out in order to try again! At one point the goal became pressing so hard that the egg cup would break, so even that is more fine motor strength and control.


42) Foam Shape Match
If you have leftover foam sheets, scrap fabric, or even construction paper, you can make this game. I had some foam sheets that had been sitting around my house since, well, I was actually teaching outside the home! You can grab a few from a craft store, or use what you have at home already. Start with cutting out basic shapes in a large size. I used some stencils I had from scrapbooking, but just freehand it or print shapes off from the computer. Whatever works for you.

Follow by cutting out about 3 smaller shapes to be matched to each large shape. For younger toddlers, I would start with about 3 large shapes and add as their skill of matching and identifying shapes increases. Lay the large shapes on the table or floor, and your child will place each smaller shape on the large shape that it matches. I wrote the name of each shape on the large shapes to increase the exposure to print.


43) Tri-Color Rotini Colored Shape Sort
Simple, cheap, quick is the name of this activity for sure! All you need is a box of tri-color rotini pasta, a piece of paper and crayons or colored pencils. Using a white piece of paper (mine is from the scrap bin) draw on 3 shapes. I drew 3 squares-one yellow, 1 orange and 1 green since the pasta came in those colors. I chose to draw squares since my toddler does not yet identify a square correctly, so I figured why use circle groupings when I could draw a shape she needed to work on.
Facilitate your child picking a piece of pasta and matching it to its corresponding colored shape. I had my toddler start with 5 noodles per shape, but less is great for children just getting used to table activities. That's it! You could add on gluing as well to adhere the pasta to the paper. Yes, my child did taste the pasta as well-multi-sensory activity!



44) Playdough Shortcut for Little Hands


This is mostly a quick tip, but since toddlers often love playdough yet have trouble flattening it in order to cut it, do the hard part for them. Take a cookie sheet, place a ball of playdough on it, and flatten it with your hands or a rolling pin. Once it is flat, your toddler will be able to press in cookie cutters or use small utensils to cut it into pieces. This makes the experience a little more engaging when the playdough may be tough to press for their little hands.

45) Easy Egg Carton Sort

Using leftover colored stickers, turn an egg carton into a color sorting game. We had leftover heart stickers from Valentine's my preschooler made. I cut an egg carton in half so we could use 6 egg cups-since the stickers came in 6 colors. I peeled off the back of each of 6 stickers and placed one in each egg cup as shown. The remaining stickers were sorted into their matching egg cup. Use any stickers you have that are small and can be matched. You could even just punch out or cut out simple shapes from construction paper, glue one in each egg cup and have 2-3 extra to sort into each cup that match the one inside it. Many options!


46) Book About Me

I have to give the credit for this idea to a friend of mine who suggested it to me when she started making one for her toddler. A book about your child is always interesting to them at this age. There are a couple of easy ways to do this no matter what your level of creativity may be. I used a photo album with plastic sleeves and I had previously made books on a photo products website. Using the photo album idea, create a book that focuses on your child. Place pictures of him/her from birth on up and write simple captions using names, places, etc. to add some literacy. My children love looking through these books pointing to familiar family members and of course spotting their own faces in the pictures. (You can tell my toddler decided to decorate the cover of her book on her own!) It is ok if the book gets "used", that is the point. A little wear and tear may happen-teach how to treat books as this occurs, but definitely let your child handle books.


47) Pom Pom Egg Carton Correspondence
Pom poms or marbles and an egg carton become a fine motor exercise in one-to-one correspondence. This is an essential skill that teaches children to point to one symbol at a time while saying what it is. You have probably seen your child count while pointing to one object more than once-counting it more than once-or not even pointing to an object but hopping their finger across a page in a book while trying to count. This activity and others that emphasize one-to-one correspondence will, over time, help establish pointing to one item at a time.
What I did was cut off the top of an egg carton. We only need the egg cups for this game. Pre-count the pom poms so that you have a number of pom poms equal to the number of egg cups in the egg carton. Ask your child to place one pom pom into each egg cup. You can count while you do this, or you can count as your child removes the pom poms after the egg cups have been filled. Pretty much as simple as it gets.




Affiliate Advertisement

©2011-2014 The Stay-at-Home-Mom Survival Guide All rights reserved. 



176 comments:

  1. Great ideas, great site, thanks for sharing. This will help with my 2-year old grandson.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Lea Ann! I hope it will be helpful. I remember your comments on the FB page. Enjoy your grandson!

      Delete
  2. These are fantastic! Thank you so much for writing them all out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You bet! No sense in keeping them all to myself. :) I am glad that you find them useful. Thank you so much for your kind words!

      Delete
  3. Awesome, I'm definitely going to try some of these with my son! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great! Thank YOU for the nice comment. Have fun!

      Delete
  4. Fantastic ideas and so simple to put together. Thank you I am off to "plan" some for mummy days this week. The junior teacher in me needs this inspiration for my children I am afraid to say!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sarah, I am so glad that you have found some ideas that will be helpful and easy to use. I hope the 'mummy days' went well. Never be afraid to seek out new ideas...we all need some inspiration at times. :) Enjoy your children!

      Delete
  5. These are really great! I can't wait to try them on my 13 month old. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Melanie, I really appreciate reading that these ideas will be helpful for you. Enjoy your growing toddler!

      Delete
  6. So practical, simple and all in one place on a list! I love it...will definitely be trying these out with my 21 month old ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Zarena, thank you so much for sharing such kind words. I hope you and your toddler have a fun time trying them out and learning together!

      Delete
  7. I babysit for a 13 month old and I am going to print this out, assemble some supplies in by "babysitting bag" and have them at the ready! He is a little love, exploring everything. I am really happy to add your hints to my arsenal. Thanks so much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, the family you babysit for is so blessed to have a sitter that seeks out creative and educational activities for their child! Good for you! I am so glad that you commented here. Babysitting was my first experience caring for the children of others and it taught me so much about children. All the best to you as you care for that baby!

      Delete
  8. what an awesome list! thank you so much for sharing!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I appreciate that kind comment. I am so glad you can use some of the ideas in your home!

      Delete
  9. That is a great list of ideas. Please stop by and link this post (and any other arts, crafts and play posts) to Artsy Play Wednesday on Capri + 3. I found your blog on Pinterest.

    : 0 ) Theresa
    http://www.multiples-mom.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Theresa, thank you for the kind comment. I looked back at your site, but the linky list was closed already. I will try my best to look out for your next list and link up! :) Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  10. Joani Martinez9/06/2012 5:57 PM

    These are amazing ideas! Can't wait to explore them with my little one. Thank you for sharing!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You bet and thank YOU for the kind words! I am glad that you have found some ideas that you would like to try. Enjoy your time with your child.

      Delete
  11. I found your post via pintrest and I'm so glad I did! These are fantastic ideas! I just started home schooling my older two and have been at a loss of what to do to keep my little one busy. Definitely going to be trying a few of these ideas next week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great, Tasha! I am so glad to hear that your children will be getting so much of your time. How wonderful for them! I truly hope these activities can be helpful for keeping your little one busy (and learning) while you are teaching the older ones. All the best!

      Delete
  12. Thanks so much for these & for the preschool activities, as well. I homeschool my 4 yr old son and niece (also 4), and will be using several ideas from that page for them. I'm "stealing" ideas from this page for my 2 yr old son to keep him included in our activities. Many of the preschool ideas can be modified for him, as well. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Feel free to "steal" away. :) I am glad that you can use a few of the ideas. You are absolutely right that many of the ideas on each age page can be modified for other age groups. All the best!

      Delete
  13. for the sensory being messy, I have a very small blow up pool that I put sensory materials in. Right now there are dry beans and spoons and scoops. Works great at maintaining the mess and easy to clean up!

    -Jennifer
    http://myyoungfamilylife.blogspot.ca/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is a great idea. Thank you for sharing.

      Delete
  14. Great ideas! Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much. I am glad that you found some that will work for you!

      Delete
  15. Such amazing ideas! Thank you. You will be my saviour! Feeling very inspired.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vicki, I am so glad to hear that you are getting inspired by these ideas! I appreciate you sharing your thoughts and I wish you all the best with your child(ren).

      Delete
  16. My son will be 12 months in a week... I know he would love all these activities but I also know that everything would end up in his mouth! For example the tape activity.. he would love peeling it off but he would also want to chew on the tape... Do you have any tips? I swear he is well fed, he loves food, but he wants to chew on everything. These activities are great and thank you for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. First off, happy birthday to your son! I am glad to hear that some of the activities here will work for you, but I do understand that many older infants and young toddlers are still putting A LOT in their mouths. I would suggest two things: #1, you can wait until he is less 'oral' to try some of the questionable ideas listed above, or #2, supervise and interact with him while playing with these ideas (such as the tape peel idea) and use the interactions as a teaching opportunity to reinforce that the tape does not go in the mouth. If you try the tape pull off, and he puts the tape in his mouth, I would say, "We peel the tape and stick it on the paper (or table), but we don't put it in our mouth. Yuck!" If he does it again, I would then say, "Ok, if you are going to put it in your mouth you are all done playing with it," and take the tape away. Eventually he will grow out of it. The third possibility, is feed him while he is playing-if he tries to put the tape in his mouth, offer him something he CAN put in his mouth and reinforce that the tape is not for eating, but a cracker is, for example. I hope those ideas can help!

      Delete
  17. I discovered this post via Pinterest and have already decided on two for my toddler to try tomorrow :) Fab ideas and different to the same ones that frequently pop up. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for sharing! I am glad to know that you can use a couple. I plan on updating this page over the next week, so stop back from time to time and check for new ideas. I will post them on Pinterest too. Take care!

      Delete
  18. I love the shredded paper idea! Will be using in my classroom this week :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Whitney, that is great! Thanks for letting me know. I love hearing when others find the ideas useful. All the best to you!

      Delete
  19. I am a mom that is now home part time with an 18 month old, who gets bored easily. Thank you so much for these great ideas to keep him entertained! And they are so easy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kelly, I hear ya! My daughter is 18 months, and I think it's more than being bored-it's their developmental stage of wanting to explore and try everything that they see. Self-control (or lack thereof) for toddlers is developing, so they really are impulse driven. Simple activities are great so that prep time is small on your end and there are a lot of productive options for your son to keep him 'busy' and learning. I am glad that you can use some of them in your home.

      Delete
  20. Great ideas! Thank you for sharing! :)

    ReplyDelete
  21. Thank you for such wonderful ideas. Some of them that I have never even thought of doing. I am definitely going to use the sock toss in my classroom. They're really into taking off and putting on socks =)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great! I am so glad to hear it. All the best to you as you wrangle and teach those toddlers.

      Delete
  22. Thank you for all your great resources!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the nice comment! Take care...and you are VERY welcome! :)

      Delete
  23. Just come across your site, lots of great ideas. Thank you.

    I have also done shaving foam on a baking tray. sprayed it in a line downwards with drops of food colouring from top to bottom then my daughter moved the shaving from side to side and made a rainbow! the food colouring washed off great as it was mixed with the shaving foam. Made other pictures with different colours, sea, grass etc etc. Endless opportunities once you start!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great ideas! Thank you for sharing that. Sounds like the experience was great fun!

      Delete
  24. What a great list of activities! But for the paint and shaving cream - well, I can tell you don't have twin boys with hyperactivity disorder! :-) Know where I can get free plans to build a cage?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Batyah, I am sure your boys keep you working hard every day! Even in my house, we save the shave cream ideas for days when I am really in the mood to deal with a lot of clean up. Maybe outside in the warmer months when you can hose them off with water to clean them up?? I am sure with active kiddos you are always finding ways to keep them burning off energy. All the best to you and your twin boys!

      Delete
  25. Thank so much for creating this! I've decided to stay home with my son this summer because of our changing daycare situation :( I tend to run out of ideas for him! Thank you thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so glad that they will be helpful to you! Take care and all the best.

      Delete
  26. Thanks for sharing this! I will definitely use some of these activities in the classroom where I'm student teaching with 18 month olds!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so glad that you are going to use them with your class of toddlers. That age group is so challenging, but so fun as well. Take care and enjoy teaching!

      Delete
  27. Thanks for putting this site together. It gave us tons of tips for a stay at home dad with a 2 1/2 year old son. Keep up the good work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great! I am so glad that you found it helpful. What a great experience for a son to have dad at home! Enjoy your time and all the best!

      Delete
  28. This is great, thank you! I have been going a little stir crazy with my little ones. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Little ones can keep us guessing on what to do next, that is for sure! It's often our patience that becomes the best skill to utilize or develop. I am glad that you will be using some of these ideas and I hope they will be helpful! Take care!

      Delete
  29. Wow, so great!! You are so clever, I was running out of ideas for my daughter but now I can't wait to do all this stuff! Thank you so much!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Chelsea! I am glad that you found this list. Hopefully many of the ideas will work for you in your home. All the best!

      Delete
  30. My husband and I are fostering a 3 year old little girl. We don't have any children of our own so getting tossed into having a toddler was a bit CRAZY to say the least. I had no idea what to do with her ALL day long. I stay home with her everyday so I am so happy to have come across this site. Saying you are clever is an understatement. I can't thank you enough for posting these ideas and helping us other mom's out!!!! I can't wait to try all of these. We are doing the beans, oats, and noodles tomorrow!!!!

    Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Congratulations to you and your husband for offering this child such support! I pray it is a rewarding experience and I am so glad you have stopped by for some resources! I appreciate your kind words and I hope trying these out in your home goes really well. Check out the Preschool page as well (tab at the top) since a 3-year old really is moving into 'preschool-ability' so both pages should be beneficial to her and you! Take care!

      Delete
  31. You've done an amazing job with posting all these great ideas on your site. Have been going a little stir crazy with my 27 month old and 15 month old, from being stuck inside with all the rain we have been experiencing up here in sunny Qld, but I'm sure the activities you have posted will definitely keep them happy and me sane. Thank u.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Esther. I do hope you are able to try a few activities from this site and I wish you all the best! I bet they will help keep your two little ones occupied with learning and exploring to allow you a moment to breathe!! I appreciate you sharing. Take care!

      Delete
  32. So glad I came across your site...i'm a stay at home Mum with my nearly 2 year old son who has energy to burn and a gorgeous and insatiable curiosity about our world. it's joyful and special to be able to spend these formative years with him but exhausting and challenging at times nonetheless! your blog had reignited my inspiration to continue nourishing my son with rich and varied experiences...thank you for taking the time to put this all together for your readers. Your children are blessed to have such a wonderful mother & teacher. Thank you, Rebecca. xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so glad you found this too! I can completely relate to the "2-year old with energy to burn"-my daughter is two and it is amazing how she just goes all day long! You are right that it is so important for us to be present for our young ones and it is challenging at times...that is for sure. I am excited for you to try some of these. Let me know how it goes. I appreciate your kind comments. You are so sweet. I just try to make the best of every day while I have an opportunity to be home with my kiddos. You take care and enjoy your family! All the best!

      Delete
  33. For those of us who aren't the most creative when it comes to childrens activities - or just need somewhere to start sometimes - you are a lifesaver!!! Thank you!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great! You are very welcome.

      Delete
  34. I was starting to feel like my nearly 18 month old was getting thoroughly bored with her regular toys, and took to the web for inspiration. This is the most fantastic site I came across, and have made a long list of things to do and play with - most of which are already in the house somewhere. I can't thank you enough for sharing your wonderful parenting skills with those of us who are definitely not as creative! Hannah x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for sharing your thoughts with me. I am glad that this site can be helpful for you. I am sure you have your own areas of creativity! Enjoy your time with your child.

      Delete
  35. I love this. I will be doing alll of these with my 16 Mo old!! I am also starting to baby sit sn 18 mo old!! So I am excited for some new learning activities for the littles!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great, Rosa! I am so glad to see that it has given you some ideas to use. Thanks for letting me know this list was helpful! Take care!

      Delete
  36. Thank you for sharing all of these great ideas. They're also nice because they're CHEAP! lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are very welcome! Cheap is good. Learning and fun do not have to be expensive. Enjoy!

      Delete
  37. Hi.. tried out a couple of ideas and worked like magic! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great, Devi! I am so glad to hear that. Enjoy your time with your children and thank you for the feedback. It's always nice to now how the activities work out when readers try them in their homes. Take care!

      Delete
  38. Thank you from accross the globe in South Africa. Lovely and fun ideas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wonderful to hear! I am glad you found this page and I hope the activities work out well for you in your home. Take care and thank you for the nice comment.

      Delete
  39. Hi,

    I have a 22-month old daughter and I work 40 hours a week from home. I do not have any help and try to take care of as much as possible Is there any specific activities that I can indulge her in? She usually watches TV and cries a lot ad recently, she has started putting things in her nose. I am so terrified I find it hard to concentrate on my work. Can you please advice me? My email id is menon.is.r@gmail.com

    Your above article is well-written and very informative!

    Regards,
    Rashmi

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rashmi, The list above is a place to start. I would encourage you to try to find a balance between spending one-on-one time with her and spending time on your work. She may need more time with you right now. It always helps to introduce an activity to her with you present and then the next time she will be better able to try it out on her own. I hope that helps! Best to you!

      Delete
  40. What fun ideas. I'll definitely try them out with my little guy.

    I would love it if you would come link up on our Artsy Play Wednesday kids' craft linky. http://bit.ly/11V6JvV

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Kristen! I will definitely link up. Thanks for the offer. Take care!

      Delete
  41. Im not a stay at home mom , Im a married dad .

    These are really cool , i especially like the pillow trail. My rowdy 2 year old boy will love it

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dads are welcome here too! :) I am glad you stopped by and am even more happy that you like the activities. Thank you for sharing and I wish you the best with your boys! Have fun!

      Delete
  42. Great tips and tricks. I liked them all. I am going to try today itself.

    ReplyDelete
  43. I still come back time and time again to remind myself of these ideas! You are so creative. Did a couple today. I have two boys: 2yr4mo and 10mo... keeping the older "busy" with anything at all is my biggest challenge so finding this list has been a huge help. Thanks! Please share ANY future ideas you have!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lindsey! I will be updating this list very soon. I hope you have fun with the new activities when you get a chance to try them! Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts. I appreciate reading that the activities are working in your home. There is more to come!! Take care.

      Delete
  44. This is such an amazing list! I have been looking for new learning activities for my 22 month old and as I read down the list I kept saying "she will love that!" or "what a great idea!" It's such a comprehensive list, full of simple activities that aren't too complicated to set up or explain. Thank you so much for sharing them all!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are very welcome, Ashlea. I am so glad to hear that they will work for you and your child! Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts. Take care!

      Delete
  45. Thank you! I love ALL of the activities!!! I will use them with my 21 month old boy! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds great! Thank you for the nice comment. All the best to you and your family!

      Delete
  46. Thank you Jaimi for your super creative sharing of ideas! Thanks also for sharing the 'science' behind the ideas. We're in Indonesia, but your ideas are quite general and useful here too.

    Do you have any thoughts about teaching a 2nd language early on? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rosita, I appreciate your comment. I am glad that the activities will work for you in your home. As far as 2nd languages, I think teaching both as early as possible is key. Speak them interchangeably. Initially, when children learn 2 languages at once, there can be more confusion or a longer period of time needed for the vocabulary to "stick". This eventually opens them up to being more capable language learners because the brain gets primed to connect the vocab from one language with another. Your child may speak a little later than 1-language children, but his/her vocabulary will be much larger once mastery of both languages occurs. Just be patient and take it slowly. I think teaching 2 languages in the home is an enriching experience. Go for it!

      Delete
    2. Thank you Jaimi for your guidance. We'll give it a go :)

      Delete
  47. THANK YOU!!! I am in desperate need of ideas for my 17 month old. I wish I was as creative as you!
    -SAHM

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are creative/skilled in your own way! I am glad you found this list and I hope you stop back-I try to update about once a month. So glad you found some ideas that will work for you. Take care!

      Delete
  48. thank u jaimi for giving me such a wonderful ideas. i got an answer for so many questions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good to know. Thank you for sharing such a nice comment here. All the best!

      Delete
  49. Yay! I was needing inspiration for my very busy little 13 month old boy who loves to play but gets frustrated with his usual toys and activities these days. Some of these are a little beyond him still, but some are perfect for his age!! I want to keep him learning and enjoying time at home...thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so glad that they can be a starting point for you. Try the activities on the Infant page as well-the activities vary from birth to age 12-15 months and then this page starts off about 13-15 months and goes up to almost age 3. Lots of ideas for him to grow into. Take care!

      Delete
  50. Thanks for all the great ideas.! I was a pre-school teacher for 17 years and had used quite a few of these types of activities but you had a lot I had never seen or used before. These will be great for my almost 1 year old grandson as he grows.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so glad to hear that! I wish you the best and enjoy your grandson.

      Delete
  51. This list is fantastic! Thank you so much for posting it! My husband and I have decided to not have children. However, my nephew is turning two next month, and he absolutely loves to do art-related activities with his mom. This post has *tons* of ideas that I can use as jumping off points for presents! For his first birthday, I gave him a bunch of hand-made items, and it will be great to be able to continue the tradition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Heather, I have done that for a friend's daughter! I love the idea of making learning games and packaging them up for birthdays. I am so glad that you are doing that as a tradition with your nephew. What a devoted aunt! I am so glad that you found some inspiration on this list!

      Delete
  52. This is excellent! After ISP i was trying to find way to educate my little Star.

    These are excellent and simple one which i can try at home.

    Thanks will share my experience with you!

    Regards,
    Priti

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Priti! Please let me know how they work for you. Take care!

      Delete
  53. You have some great ideas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Sarah. I appreciate that! I hope you found some you can try.

      Delete
  54. Brilliant ideas.I will apply gradually all of them.Thanks very much for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Great Idea, Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
  56. Hi there, I'm a SAHM too, I just love this blog, I've tried several activities from here and they all worked very well. Thanks a million. This blog is 'inspiration' to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for sharing that! I am so glad to hear that the activities worked in your home too. That makes me happy!!

      Delete
  57. Wow! This is great! I have an infant and a toddler and really needed something to keep me from losing my mind today. Your suggestions worked! You are a Godsend! Thanks for the info!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I appreciate that and am so glad to hear that this list could be helpful. We all have rough days and need some support, that is for sure!

      Delete
  58. Found this on Pinerest. I LOVE these ideas! I have most of the supplies in my home already. These are great ideas to keep my 2 year old busy while I homeschool my 7 year old. Thank you for posting!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds like a great plan, Holly! I hope that homeschooling your 7 year old...and engaging your 2 year old in some learning games works well for you all. All the best to you!

      Delete
  59. I love your blog! I just wanted to let you know that I've added you to my blog roll: www.amyroachsenter.blogspot.com

    Thanks for posting!

    Amy Senter
    ASpoolofThread
    www.aspoolofthread.etsy.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much, Amy. Any way I can share with other moms is welcomed by me. Thanks for spreading the news. :)

      Delete
  60. Hi, I just found your this page and I have to say, I am very amazed by the ideas that you have. Thank you soo much for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you and you are very welcome. Can't keep the activities to myself! I hope they will work for you in your home.

      Delete
  61. Thank you so much for writing all of this out and putting pictures! I thought I could handle staying home with my LO (after all he IS my second and I have a background in early childhood education) but he is now two and terrorizing and my brain is FRIED. I had run out of ideas to keep him entertained and content, while still learning. Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Toddlers have a tendency to fry our brains, don't they?! I completely understand. :) I am glad that this page can be helpful. I know it helps me with my 2-year old. Take care!

      Delete
  62. THIS IS AMAZING! I have pinned almost every activity. So simple to create. I stumbled on this last night and have already tried the ice scooping activity this morning. He was anxious to play again after his lunchtime nap. Can't wait to explore the other games and the rest of ur page with my 21 month old and 3 month old boys.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so sweet to share them! Thank you. I am so excited that you are using the activities! Thanks for sharing your thoughts with me.

      Delete
  63. Great Work!! This helped me a lot to teach colours to my 18 month old boy...
    Amazing creative work!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great to know! I am glad you shared that with me. Take care!

      Delete
  64. fair play some great ideas thanks for the help :)x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You bet! Glad they could be helpful.

      Delete
  65. This is awesome tips!! Thank you! l have a 16 month old son, Jackson and l have been trying to think of creative, fun, educational activities. These are very financially reasonable or FREE. THANK YOU SO MUCH! Great ideas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so glad that they will work for you in your home. Have fun with your toddler!

      Delete
  66. Hi> my son is 6 yrs and he gets bored very easily. any suggestions for keeping him busy on weekends apart from studies. it will be a great help. Thanks in advance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nitin, I have a page of activities just for Early Elementary-aged kids. You can click on the "Early Elementary Activities" tab at the top of this page. I hope some of those ideas can work for you!

      Delete
  67. Simple and perfect! I have a 1 year and 9 months son and there´s always that moment in a raining cold day that you have no ideas anymore... Thank you for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very true, Ana. It can be hard some days to figure out what to do next. I am glad to know this list can be helpful!

      Delete
  68. Wow! I love how easy and affordable these activities are! Very frugal!

    http://xoxofrugalmomma.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are frugal-I wouldn't want it to be any other way. Thanks for stopping by to check them out.

      Delete
  69. Here's a really fun and cheap activity...We paint exterior walls with water. So get the normal paint things for outside that house that you probably have already, and use water instead of paint. Painting brick or stucco is best bc it is easier to see. They can see where they are painting, and then it just dries up when they are done, no cleanup!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! That is such a common activity to do outside. I first learned of it when teaching preschool. My own children really enjoy painting with water and you are right there is very little cleanup necessary.

      Delete
  70. Here's a really fun and cheap activity...We paint exterior walls with water. So get the normal paint things for outside that house that you probably have already, and use water instead of paint. Painting brick or stucco is best bc it is easier to see. They can see where they are painting, and then it just dries up when they are done, no cleanup!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is one of our favorites too! It has been one that is a 'go to' for me since I was teaching preschool. Kids love the simple activities, don't they?

      Delete
  71. too good..
    loved all of them.. keep sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much! I will keep posting. I have a few stored up just waiting to get added to the list. :)

      Delete
  72. Hi, Im a french new teacher and your blog is just awsome ! It helps me a lot throught my work! thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so glad that it has been a helpful resource for you! I wish you the best with teaching-enjoy those little ones and all that they can learn! :)

      Delete
  73. Nice ideas! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  74. AMAZING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOVE THEM ALLL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! That is quite the powerful comment. ;) I appreciate you stopping by and I am so glad that you can use these ideas. All the best to you!

      Delete
  75. So many wonderful ideas, with winter now here i cant wait to try some of these out with my kids, thank you for sharing, now following you
    Sheena @ http://thekeeperofcheerios.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for sharing that, Sheena! I will stop by your blog and check it out. I appreciate your kind words. I hope you and your kids have fun with them!

      Delete
  76. What great ideas! I look forward to using many of these with my toddler during my winter break when we are stuck at home because of inclement weather. Thank you for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Katie, I hope you had a great time using these ideas in your home!

      Delete
  77. These are fantastic! Thank you for sharing. These will be great to keep our busy 18-month preoccupied with me, daddy or our nanny! Thank you so much for sharing your ideas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jennifer, I am so glad that they can be helpful! Thanks for sharing your thoughts and I wish you and your family all the best.

      Delete
  78. Too good. It has great ideas to keep the terrible toddlers busy :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for that kind comment. I am glad that you like them! Take care.

      Delete
  79. So many great activities for our super active little friends.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am very glad you think so! Toddlers are so very active, aren't they!?

      Delete
  80. I am now home with a seventeen and a three month old. I was feeling guilty because I am not very creative when it comes to finding things for my kids to do. Since I found this site feel so much better. Thank you so much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't feel guilty! The best things that you do are the regular household things that your children get to see you do. They learn so much just from your presence and interaction. I wish you well and am glad this site is helping a bit!

      Delete
  81. I love shaving foam, especially using it in the bathtub as it its easier to clean and turns the bathwater all different colours. The pom magnet board is also an excellent idea. Thank you for this fantastic list.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is so easy to use the shaving cream in the bath. We usually just use it then as well due to the ease of clean up like you mentioned and the fun colors. I appreciate your kind words and thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  82. Thank you! We can't afford preschool at the moment for when our son turns 3 soon (the cheapest is $450/month) and I had been worried about just letting him not go to preschool and then go to kindergarten and being behind. This site is going to be a huge help in making a plan to teach him. Even if it's only an hour at a time, 3 times a week right now. This will be a huge help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I bet you will be amazed by what he learns just from being with you and engaging with you at home. The simple things are what really instill learning. These are the same activities I used to "homeschool preschool" when my son was 3 and 4 years, so I know they work! :) I wish you well.

      Delete
  83. Hi! This might be silly, but could you tell me how you clean your egg cartons? And is there a trick to being sure bacteria isn't lurking in the pores of the Styrofoam? I'm afraid of using them and having my boys get sick from improper cleaning. I appreciate your help! Also, thank you for this fabulous list of ideas! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lynda, that is not a silly question at all. First off, I always seem to leave the egg carton sitting around so any residual egg white is dried by the time I ever use it with the kids. Then it just flakes away, and you can wash with warm soapy water if you like, but I have to be honest, I have not usually done more than wipe the dry carton out. My kids never really put the cartons in their mouths, and I made sure to tell them not to if they tried. Do what you feel comfortable with-wiping it out with a wet soapy rag or even a baby wipe could work well. Then let it dry completely before using. Take care!

      Delete
  84. Jessica Tonkin2/11/2014 11:10 AM

    These were awesome! My 21 month old daughter LOVED balancing on the pillows! Great activities when we're snowed in!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great, Jessica! I am so glad to read that it was a fun activity for you both. Stay warm!

      Delete
  85. These are fantastic! Definitely this will workout for my kid. Please keep update these kinds of nice ideas.. Will be very useful for many parents.Thank you so much for sharing your ideas! Regards, Bhuvana

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Bhuvana. I am so glad that they can work for you in your home. Enjoy!

      Delete
  86. What great ideas! SO glad I found your site. My 13 month old sat and played for 30 minutes using the activity table idea. I had to tell her it was time to stop! I just sent a link to your site to some friends.....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I am so glad to hear that your child had a good time. I appreciate you sharing the link to this site with others. I hope it can help as many moms as possible. Take care!

      Delete
  87. Do you do pinterest? I would love to pin this so I can use it!
    Love these ideas and can't wait to use them with my two busy bodies :)

    ReplyDelete
  88. This is amazing!!! Thank you for sharing! I am a young 1st time mom and finding things to do with my 23 month old is hard!

    ReplyDelete
  89. Awesome list! Thanks so much for taking the time to compile such an amazing array of activities. I can't wait to try them all :) Julia

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking a moment to share!