Preschool Activities





Now the teacher will be formed in you.  Part of our job as SAHMs is preparing our children for school.  Yep, soon enough your little angel will be engaged in your official  homeschool activities, or wearing a backpack and headed into the world of 'standardized' education. You can do so much, and already have, but here is a little more creativity and guidance to make this prep time fun for you both! As SAHMs we are homeschooling from birth, so add a little cheap learning into your day to continue the teaching. Click on the title of the linked activities to read the full description.



(For more information about the development of Preschoolers, 
check out my post: Crash Course in Child Development: Preschoolers.)



One Item Activity Series
A running series of activities that require only one item to prep for a bunch of learning and fun.

DIY Yoga Mat Hopscotch Activity
Three supplies are all you need to create this simple hopscotch mat for indoor gross motor play. Keeps kids moving on the indoor bad weather days.

Skeleton Anatomy Activity for Kids
Two free printables plus the child's own picture help even the young child see what their bones look like in their body. Book list of children's books about the human body also included.


Simple busy bag activity that teaches the math concept of patterning. You can use sorting bears or Legos!

With a package of multi-colored tape purchased at your local hardware store, you can create a simple and educational table activity for your preschooler to learn about patterns.

Part of the 40 Days of Sensory Bin Fillers series. I include a few quick tips for using sensory experiences indoors.

Service Project for Kids
Here is a simple idea for teaching kids about their environment, personal responsibility and taking care of the Earth.

Learning Letters and Shapes with Stickers
Do you have a ton of stickers in the house and not really sue how to use them up? Try this easy-to-create activity that reinforces shapes and/or letters.

Homemade Summer Fun with Kids
A few activities for summer time whether you are playing indoors or out.

Learning Games with Cardboard Tube Apple Trees
Cardboard tubes are great for creating and these activities use cardboard tube trees as the base for learning a lot of math and literacy skills-7 activities are explained!

Learn Animal Names with Animal Nametags
Toy animals are always a hit in our house, and we added a little literacy with this activity.

Yarn Pictures
A simple fine motor exercise, art activity, and practice using glue. All you need is paper, yarn and glue! 

DIY Games Using DVD cases
I shared a few ideas for activities using old DVDs and DVD cases. They make great quiet time activities, or activities for your next car trip.

Large "I Spy" Bottle and Printable Search Activity Sheet
The I Spy bottle is an often shared idea on blogs. I decided to make mine extra large to add some fun and extra objects. This post also shares how to make your own search worksheet to create a fun write-on activity from the I Spy Bottle.

If You Take a Mouse to School

Read 'If You Take a Mouse to School by Laura Numeroff. Then do the things the mouse did in the story: 
A) Build a mouse house using blocks. We even used playdough to mold furniture.
B) Perform the volcano experiment on the kitchen table or counter. Place a cup on a cookie sheet, fill cup with some baking soda, and then pour in vinegar. The cookie sheet keeps vinegar/soda mix from spilling all over.
C) Have your child write a story. They can tell you the words while you write, or they can 'journal' by drawing a picture of what happened during the volcano experiment.
D) Read the book again and point out each of the activities that you did when the mouse performs them.


Cardboard box creations

I never met a preschooler who couldn't be creative using a cardboard box!  My son climbs into any empty box that happens to be on the floor and immediately is 'racing in a car,' 'flying to the moon,' or 'mailing himself to his grandparents'!  My husband has turned cardboard boxes into a train engines and a fort.  If you have one lying around it could be a hideout, or a doll's house.  Don't be too quick to throw it away before letting your child give it a new life!

Counting with stickers! 
Count everything, all of the time.  If you are reading a book about numbers, don't just read through the words, actually point to each amount and show the association between the number symbol and 'how many'. 

You will need  a piece of paper and some stickers-I save them when they come in the mail whether they are address labels we don't need, or the ones from the children's movie club companies.  Write numbers 1-5, or higher depending on how big your paper is, but leave a good amount of space around each number symbol to allow for stickers.  The picture below illustrates it.  Point to number 1, and have your child place 1 sticker under it.  Point to '2', and have them place 2 stickers there, etc., etc., until you have completed each number.  We had to do this activity twice!  


Oats, peas, beans and barley grow

One of the main learning experiences in a daycare is the sensory table.  It is always a busy center.  Make one at home!  Children love playing with uncooked rice, uncooked beans, dry noodles, dry rolled oats, etc.  They can get their hands in it, sharpen their fine motor skills by picking pieces up, and they can measure, scoop, and pour.  I have dry beans, and an old set of measuring cups for my son to play with.  Of course you can only use this with toddlers who are not putting things in their mouth since this is a choking hazard for children still in an oral stage.

My son scoops and pours with the measuring cups.  They are 'nesting cups' in reality, but better since they have the measurement listed on them so this can be a math game as well.  Let your child explore it.  I usually set it up on our deck or in the yard so that any mess can be eaten by the birds.  (Bird seed is an option as well. )


Other items we have used in my classrooms are water, snow, water and dish soap, water and food coloring (be careful with clothes), shredded paper, and sand.


 Alphabet book

Get a plastic folder that has closures in the middle to hold plastic sleeves.  Go to www.drjean.org and click on "Free Activities", then "Letter Vests", and download the groups of letters.  Print off the letters (upper and lower case) and put one letter paper into each plastic sleeve.  I have one organized where the upper case 'A' and the lower case 'a' can both be seen at the same time: 'A' on the left side and 'a' on the right.  As we work on the alphabet, I write words that start with each letter (that we discover over time) on the back side of the lower case letter.  That is our 'Aa' words page.  

So, if your version looks like mine, you will open the folder cover to the back of the 'A' page, then turn the page to see 'A' on your left and 'a' on your right.  Turn the page again and you will have the back of the 'a' page on your left to be used as your page for 'Aa' words, and then on the right will be the back of the 'B' page. You don't have to use printed out letters; you can just write each letter on paper and staple it all together.  I wanted something a little more durable.  It's a work in progress as you study the letters and find words that start with letters of the alphabet.  This is one of those activities we spend time on during rainy days, or when my son discovers something outside like a leaf or an acorn.  A good grasp of the alphabet is a goal for 4 year olds.  

 Make a puzzle

It is very easy to make a puzzle and you have everything you need at home.

A) Print off a picture on photo paper. (I use 8x11 size, but you could also print onto regular paper, cardstock or construction paper.) If you have it, you can cover the printout with clear contact paper, but don't worry if you don't have this on-hand.

B) Cut the picture into puzzle shapes for older kids, or simple squares for younger ones. Keep in mind that the more pieces you cut, the smaller they will be and the greater the challenge to put them together.


C)  Give your child the puzzle to put together.


They will have so much fun seeing their own face if you use a personal photo.  You can include your child in the creation process so that they see this project from start to finish, or surprise them with it: a new, free, toy!


This activity is great, because store-bought puzzle pieces get lost, or damaged.  I try to give puzzles a long life even if pieces are not pristine, but this project allows you to create new puzzles almost instantly if others get too shabby to keep!  You can print a few images that coincide with your child's newest interest (cartoon characters, cars, horses, frogs, etc.)  It's a very versatile activity and can be personalized for each child's interests.

Coloring Crafts

I love these and they keep my 3 1/2 year old busy at the table for at least an hour..no kidding!  They are little craft kits you can find at your local Craft Store. They cost about $1.  The kit comes with a wooden item (monster truck, pumpkin, animal, etc.) a wooden stand for the completed item, and little markers to use for coloring it.  There are holiday-themed kits and others.  When your child finishes coloring, the wooden stand fits into a notch in the bottom of the item and you can stand it up for display.  Grab a few for those rainy days and days when Mom may be under the weather! A great table activity.

As an extension, you can always glue craft materials onto these wooden cut-outs as well in case you want to add an element.  Use orange yarn to decorate the pumpkin, or pieces of aluminum foil to cover the hub caps of a monster truck cut-out.  Lots of avenues for use.


 Water Colors
I am a huge fan of basic, simple activities that allow your child to direct the creativity.  Watercolors fulfill that bill.  You can find the water color paints at a dollar store, the grocery store or a department store.  Lay a towel down on the surface where your child will paint to help absorb spills and drips, and let your child create away.  This a great activity for exploring color mixing as well in case you want to work in a little adult-directed learning.

Fort and Tunnels
Using blankets in your home, place them over the top of your dining room table so they hang over the edges creating a fort under your table.  You can also turn the chairs backwards and push the backs up to the side of the table to help hold the blankets in place.  We have also draped a blanket from the couch to the coffee table to create a tunnel. Children have fun hiding out in hidden spaces, and having 'their' space.  My son always wants me to play with him: he brings toys in the fort, and loves when my daughter crawls in to hide out with him. We take a flashlight inside and read books, etc. This is a great change-up for a rainy day stuck inside.

Cardboard box creations, part 2

Don't just make a cardboard box creation and use it for a day!  Extend the play by having your child paint their box toy.  Whether it's a fort or a train engine (as in the picture here), your child will have fun 1) painting, 2) personalizing, and 3) enjoying another layer of fun with the cardboard box.


 Alphabet Match

I had a supply of upper and lower case letter cards that I purchased for my teaching collection back when I was in college.  After rummaging through some bins of materials, I came up with a game to utilize them, but you can make your own letter cards with index cards or construction paper.



Letter Tracing sheets 
Create your own letter tracing sheets for your child.  Make dotted outlines of each letter, or word, that you want your child to practice writing. Make photocopies of your 'master' sheet so that you have a quick, easy way to make extras-my son wanted to do this twice in a row, and I did not want to sit and make the dotted letters again!  Hand your child a crayon, pen, pencil, or marker, and teach them the correct way to write their letters.  I use upper case first since they are generally easier to write, but you could combine both.


Magnetic Letter Match
 On a magnetic white board, write the alphabet in whichever case you prefer.  Using letter magnets (you can find them in the dollar aisle at Walmart, or at the Dollar Store among other retailers), have your child place the magnetic letter over the written letter.  Repeat as necessary or interested!

Dress Up!


 Create a dress-up bin or collection for your child using items that you have in the house. First, old Halloween costumes are great for this, and then you get more use than one night!  Also, my son in the picture is wearing an old button-down shirt with a men's necktie tied around his waist as a belt.  We happened to have the tricorn hat and voila! a dress-up pirate. (He is making his 'pirate face'.) Add hats you find in the dollar aisle at Target, or old items that would otherwise be donated.  Even old tank tops can be 'dresses' for little girls, and you know they love wearing adult shoes, so let them explore with what you already have and don't want anymore.



Invisible Appearing Picture

Start with a white piece of construction paper.  Have your child color a design on the paper using a white crayon.  After your child has colored, give them water color paints and let them paint over the paper.  As they cover the paper with paint, the white crayon picture will be revealed!  (Tip: Place a towel or a paper bag that has been cut to lay flat, on your table or work surface to help absorb the extra water and drips from the painting process.)


Letter (reversal) Sort

Many young children need practice to avoid reversals, or mistaking one letter for another that looks like its mirror image, or that looks like it in reverse.  For example, in the pictures below, 'b' and 'd', and even 'p' can be mistaken for each other.  This will help work out that error and solidify the letters in your child's memory.

A) Take two empty facial tissue boxes, and cut out the plastic that lines the opening in the top.


B) Write the two letters, or numbers, to be practiced on a piece of paper.  Cut them out as the picture shows and tape or glue one letter to each box as in Figure 1. (Numbers are shown in Figure 2.)

C) Make copies of each letter on sentence strips (Figure 3) or construction paper (Figure 4).  Index cards can work as well.  Cut apart the letters as shown in Figure 5.

D) Make a mixed pile of the letter cards and show your child how to hold the card up next to the box to compare the letters.  Place the card into its correct box.

This is a great table activity when you are making dinner.  Make sure you observe the first time; I found that my son was making mistakes when I was not paying attention, but it's an easy game to check since you can look through the cards that are in each box to determine if your child has secured this visual discrimination skill, or if he needs more work.  You can use all four sides of the tissue boxes as well. Just place the two sides that you want your child to work with in front of them, and you have a 4-way game all in one!

Egg Carton Number Find
Using a 12-count or 18-count egg carton, write a number in the bottom of each egg cup.  You can either use the plastic Easter eggs or a clothespin to create a matching game, or use one clothespin to use this as a counting and quiz game. 

If using the Easter eggs, write one number on each egg so that you have one egg per egg cup in the carton.  Your child can match the egg to its corresponding numbered cup, and the eggs can store in the carton when not in use.
For the clothespin version, write a number on each clothespin, and have your child clip the clothespin to the egg cup as pictured.  This will really challenge their fine motor skills, visual discrimination, and counting ability!  To store, place the clothespins in a zip top bag, or plastic container/bowl.

To quiz your child, give them the clothespin and ask, "Where is ten?"  See if they can correctly clip the clothespin to the number 10 cup.  

Milk Cap Name


A) Write your child's name on an index card and tape the card to a zip top bag.


B) Write each of the letters in the name on milk caps.

C) Show your child how to place the milk caps under their corresponding letter on the card so they spell out their name.

D) You can even create bags of milk cap letter for other members of the family or other words for favorite toys, etc.  Make a set of these to use for word making as your child gets older as well!


Letter Sticker Collage

I bought stickers from the dollar aisle at Target, and my son created a collage using the first letter of his name.  Great workout for the fine motor skills of trying to pick up the sticker and stick it on the paper as well as the literacy exercise of reinforcing the first letter of his name.

For more letter work: buy a package of alphabet stickers, write the letters from A to Z and have your child place the matching stickers on the written letters for more one-to-one correspondence practice, or just try a letter a day to teach one letter at a time!



Color Circles Sticker Sort

The younger preschooler will have fun sorting the colored stickers into color groups.  Grab a package of the 4-color circle stickers from an office supply store.  Divide a piece of paper into 4 spaces as shown in the picture.  Using colored markers, write the color words using their respective colored marker writing one color per square. Let your child take a sheet of stickers and place the corresponding sticker in its matching square on the paper.  This activity teaches visual discrimination (the ability to discriminate between visible similarities and differences in size, shape, pattern, form, and color), and color recognition.




Tree Parts Diagram
Using sticks, twigs, and leaves, glue parts on a piece of paper and label the parts of a tree.  Talking with your child as you work on this, tell them the biggest stick will be the trunk, the smaller twigs are like the branches, and add the leaves.  Draw on roots, and label all the parts to encourage literacy!  We underlined the first letter of each tree part to identify which letters started each word. 



 Beverage Box Matching

Toilet paper rolls and beverage boxes (see Fig. 1) are perfect partners for this versatile matching activity. You need an empty beverage box that has the 12 part divider in the bottom (generally for 12 bottles), 12 toilet paper rolls (empty), glue, and scissors. You will also need 12 different scraps of paper, wrapping paper, or different colors of paint.


  First step is to cut down the sides of the box to the level of the top of the divider insert just to make it easier to place the tubes in the sections and retrieve them.  Secondly, glue construction paper to the sides of the box so that no logos or labels are showing.  I wrote "Pattern/Color Sorting Game" on one of the finished sides to label it.

  Second, wrap each toilet paper tube with a piece of paper, or paint each with a different color.  Also, cut a small square of each paper to match the tube.

 Third, glue a piece of paper around one tube wrapping the paper around completely.  Glue the matching square piece of paper to the bottom of one of the sections in the box as shown in the picture. Repeat 11 more times so that each tube is covered by a different color or patterned paper, or painted a different color, and each tube has a matching section in the box.


 That's the game!  
It's your child's job to match the tube to the corresponding 
section in the box.  

 Depending on your child's skill level, use plain colored paper or patterned paper as I have shown here.  You can even wrap each tube in the same color paper and draw shapes on the tubes and corresponding shapes drawn on the square pieces that get glued into the box. This exercises eye-hand coordination, knowledge of one-to-one correspondence, visual discrimination, and if you use numbers or shapes on the tubes, the names of them as well.  It's a great way to get rid of those last wrap scraps without just throwing them away.


Easy Dry Erase Tracing

Make a dotted tracing sheet for you child.  I quickly create a numbers tracing sheet and alphabet tracing sheet on construction paper, and slip the sheets into gallon zip top bags.  Using dry erase markers, your child can trace the dotted numbers or letters to practice writing.  The marker wipes off with a paper towel.  It will stain a bit, but takes a nice amount of pressure to erase so it helps with extra pent up energy too! (To really clean it, use a little window cleaner on a paper towel.) Reusable and can travel: clip to a clipboard and you have a car activity too!

Cutting Practice

When supervising, let your child use scissors.  They will need to use this skill in school or at home when completing craft projects.  It is a skill that is checked during assessment time in preschool.  Create your own assessment/practice sheet by drawing lines on a piece of construction paper as in the picture below.  It takes practice, but let your child learn and try.


 Domino Counting Match

I happened to get a set of paper dominoes from a Christmas cracker over this past holiday season. (You know the ones you pull apart and there is a crown, fortune, and little trinket inside?)  Well, I created a little matching game (that I use as a 'station' or table activity).  I traced around the dominoes on a piece of paper. Wrote the numbers 1-12, one number for each rectangle, and wrote the number word as well.  The goal is for your child to count the dots on a domino and match it to the correct rectangle.  This helps associate an amount with its symbol, i.e. *****=5.  If you don't have paper or plastic dominoes, make some out of black construction paper and a correction fluid pen, or white paint, or just cut some small rectangles out of index cards and make black dots for each number amount.  Store the dominoes in a zip-top bag and you can even glue the paper into a file folder to create an easy storage method...a file folder game.

Sensory Bean Sort

Using a plastic apple container, muffin tin, or egg carton, sort a mixture of seeds and beans.  You can start with the mixed items in a small bowl and sort into the carton or tin. My son was very focused on this! It is great for fine motor control, visual discrimination, and encourages organization.



In the book, by Laura Numeroff, a kite gets tangled in a tree.  I used some quick thinking one rainy day to come up with this book extension activity:

A) Cut a diamond shape out of paper, glue straws or craft sticks to the back that have been cut to fit for    stability.  

B) Glue or tape a string to the bottom of the kite, and tangle the string around a toy tree. Don't have a toy tree? Use a toilet paper tube as the trunk, cut slits in the side so you can slide straws or craft sticks in as branches and then tangle the string around it.  
The tougher the tangle the more this turns into a fine motor and problem solving exercise. 



Seed Counting

After making acorn squash as the veg one night for dinner, I saved and washed the seeds (because they had to be used for something). I created a counting activity for my preschooler: As in the picture below, Write the numbers from 1 on up to as high as you can fit on the paper you are using. Draw a circle below each number to be used as the 'amount' location.  Have your child count out the right amount of seeds to place in each circle.  Glue them on the paper. Teaching numbers is not just about identification; it's important to teach the amount of each as well.

Small, Medium, Large Keeper!
I call this a 'keeper', because it is a great learning activity but also one to keep for posterity!  Trace your hand and your child's hand as well as that of a sibling, stuffed animal, or dad.  Discuss which one is the biggest, which is the smallest and which is in the middle.  Assign/teach the terms small, medium and large or big. Write the words next to each hand that fits the description as in the picture.  Write names and the date as well so you can look back on the little hand prints long after they are bigger than yours.


Moon Phase Cracker Bites

At lunch one day, my son bit into his cracker and said, "Look! The moon is half quarters full."  Obviously we needed to discuss the terms and not using them all together, so we did, using our crackers. I bit into mine to show 1/4 full, 1/2 full and full (obviously no bite, just a full cracker).  I then talked about how when the moon gets 'more white', it is 'waxing' and when it gets 'more black,' it is 'waning.'  Don't be afraid to follow your child's lead and discuss complex phenomenon on simple terms.  It's exposure, which is what childhood should be!



Swat It!

I learned this trick from a master teacher when I was in college: Use a fly swatter as a pointer.  Cut out a rectangle in the middle of a fly swatter (unused...aka clean). (Cut horizontally as in the picture for words and vertically for single letters or numbers). Have your child swat at numbers on the white board, letters on the chalkboard, or words that he can find around the house.  Go on a letter/number/word scavenger hunt.  This activity is great for releasing focused energy through the swatting motion, and it is still teaching!



Make-Your-Own Sewing Cards
Starting with construction paper, have your child paint a design on the paper.  You can also use an already painted project as well. Cut the paper into a definite shape or item-square, heart, boot, mitten.  Punch holes along the outside edge (all the way around the item) using a hole punch. Cut a length of yarn that will weave in and out around the entire cutout. Cover the paper cutout with clear contact paper, lamination, or clear packaging tape. Re-punch the holes. Tie one end of yarn to one hole, and wrap masking tape around the opposite end of the yarn (the untied end) to make a needle. Model for your child how to sew around the homemade sewing card. Away your child goes on their fine motor experience!



Shredded Paper Sensory
Shredded paper is something we ALWAYS have plenty of in our paper shredder bin.  It can be used as a sensory bin material.  I hide magnets or foam letters inside the paper shreds. The letters can be pulled out and arranged in alphabetical order, or can be matched to letters written on a dry erase board. Do the same with number magnets or foam numbers. 


Toy Sequencing
A very important skill for preschoolers to develop is following multi-step directions. Teaching this can be verbal (just asking your child to do things teaches listening to and following directions) but it can be fun to enhance this skill through hands-on and visual experiences. Here is one idea I thought up:

A) Take pictures of individual train cars (or small toys if your child does not have trains).  I took pics of about 6 train cars. 

B) Print off the pictures in wallet size, cut out, mount on construction paper or cover with contact paper/packing tape to protect.

C) Arrange the pics in an order and have your child use the actual train cars (or toys) to arrange the toys in the order of the pictures.

D) Once your child has created the arrangement, rearrange and try it again in another sequence.  Have your child arrange the pictures and you arrange the toys to switch roles and let your child have some control of the game.

ABC book Word Match
Turn a simple ABC book into an advanced activity for your preschooler. Write words on sticky notes or pieces of masking tape. (You need one word for each letter of the alphabet. If the book has pictures near each letter, write the word of the item pictured.)


 Show your child the words, and ask them to find the letter that begins each word. Stick the word next to the letter. Continue until all of the words are stuck in the book. Read through the book to 'check' their work.

Color-Change Flowers

My preschoolers always loved this experiment. Using white flowers, or celery, color water in two containers with food coloring and leave the water in one container clear. Place a flower (or stalk of celery) in each glass.
 Create a simple chart labeled "What will happen to the flowers?"  Make two columns and three rows as pictured. I labeled one column "Guess" and one column "Actual."  My son made his prediction for each flower, and we watched them over 3 days.  On the last day (you can watch them however long you want) we recorded his words for what happened to each flower in the last column.  This is a simple way for a child to be introduced to the structure of the scientific method as well as be exposed to a project that takes more than one sitting to complete.

Cotton Swab Writing

This activity started as a dot-dot activity of the letters. My son decided after a few letters that simply 'writing' the letters with the cotton swab was more industrious. You can do this with smaller children with one letter at a time, or as it is pictured here.  My emphasis was ob the direction of writing the letters (starting at the top, crossing from left to right, etc.)  Just another way to explore and write the letters...or numbers.

Felt Board Yarn Letters

Getting children hands-on for letter exploration is exciting for them and breaks up their learning to not only involve tracing or writing on paper.  I like this activity for the child that is not so keen on sitting and writing.



First, make your own mini-felt board. Using the insert that comes inside a new or dry-cleaned mens dress shirt (that hard thin board) or a piece of cardboard, hot glue a scrap piece of felt or fleece on it. On the back I glued a small piece of rug-grip to help keep the felt board in place on a table since it will tend to slide due to the fabric.

Second, cut a piece of yarn long enough to form letters and numbers.  Starting at the top left of the letter, as you would in writing, form the letter with the yarn. Double back as needed (and as you would when writing) to show that you don't lift up your pencil when writing. The yarn really shows the path of creating a letter.  Cut small pieces of yarn to use when 'crossing' the A or the 'T'.


Bean Reveal Puzzle
 Using a quilt, or picture, cover a defined object with sensory material like beans or rice. Slowly move the beans off of the object as your child tries to guess what is being revealed. Little by little increase the amount of the object seen until your child guesses what the object is. We used a quilt that had many different construction trucks pictured. You could use pages of a book as well. Have your child turn as you cover a picture, and then they get to look as you slowly move the beans in this guessing game.

Focus Words Trace

After playing outside one day, my son and I were talking about all the things we saw outside. I wrote down the words on sentence strips in highlighter and then had my son trace over my writing with a marker of his choice. We read the word as he wrote it. It was simple, quick letter writing practice/exposure and it was relevant to what we had just been doing. This technique is very handy for making quick tracing sheets: use highlighter! Your child then writes over in a darker or different color to allow them to see formed letters and follow them a little easier than dotted letter tracing sheets.
 To expand, I underlined the beginning letter in each word and he told me what the letter was: I said, "Sand. What letter is first in 'sand'?" He would answer, "'S'!"

Nailing Letters and Numbers
Have a child that likes to bang? Give them a reason to and a productive activity that requires burning a little energy. Using a scrap piece of wood, write letters, numbers, a name, etc on the board and demonstrate to your child how to use a hammer to tap nails along the written symbols. Your child will be tracing the symbols using the nails. This is a great activity to do in the garage on a rainy day, or even outside on a nice one. Provide safety gear-goggles-and a lesson on only hitting the nail or wood with the hammer. You can eliminate any letters or numbers and still this activity exercises eye-hand coordination, gross and fine  motor skills, and utilizes that focused energy that can really allow a child to expel 'the wiggles.'

Write About it with Dictation
All children love to hold on to treasures they locate at the playground, in the backyard or on a trail walk. My son collected some leaves at our neighborhood playground, and wanted to take them home. After we got them home, he glue them on a piece of paper-so we could hang them on the fridge-and I asked him a few questions about the leaves.  I told him we could write a story about the leaves and that I could write what he told me. I asked some focused questions to get him started such as: "Where did you find these leaves?" "How many are there?" "What do they feel like?" "What sound do they make when you touch them?"  After we were done, I re-read what he had dictated so he understood the written word connection to his spoken words. We even included some pictures and basic facts that made this little piece of dictation look like a scientific report. You can extend any activity in this way-paintings, block creations (take a picture, print it out and attach dictation to it), etc.

Make a Globe

Long-term projects teach patience and perseverance. We used paper mache to make a globe (since we did not have one at the time that my son was interested in learning about the Earth and where we are located on it). I blew up a balloon, and layered on some paper mache. My son tried to help, but he got bogged down by the messiness of it at the time. I took over and completed the layers of paper-letting each layer dry before adding more. I did have to remind my son that it took time for each layer to dry and harden, and it was a hard concept to grasp, but he saw the globe taking shape and eventually he painted it blue for the oceans. I did my best to outline the continents and then my son painted in the green land masses. It is not perfect, but it works. It fulfilled my son's interest in completing a 'project' and allowed me to provide him with some Space exploration at home. Don't be afraid of long-term projects that require a few days or a couple weeks to complete. It is not only teaching the lesson of its subject matter but is also teaching patience!

Colored Tape Pattern Play



At your local hardware store near the electrical supplies, you can find colored electrical tape. It costs about $3 for about 5 rolls. I created some patterns using the tape and left them on the dining room table for my son in the morning. He immediately started using the safety scissors to cut small strips that mimicked the patterns I created for him to follow. Cheap, easy pattern practice and scissor practice as well.

Skeleton Exploration
Option A: We have a small plastic skeleton model that breaks apart and a book that talks about the bones. I printed off a full body picture of my son standing up and he can lay the bones over his picture to locate where each bone is located in his own body. I found a printable skeleton that you can print off and cut apart to do the same thing at your home! Print off this skeleton worksheet, cut it apart-arms, thighs, lower legs, upper arms, lower arms, hands, etc. 
Your child can lay each cut out part over his or her own picture to see what their bones look like inside their body. Reading books about the body and bones are helpful and an interesting companion activity.

Option B: Type the names of each part of the body and print out the list. Cut them apart to have one label per body part. Read the label to your child and have them place the label on its corresponding body part. This will increase print awareness and encourage reading.

Shave Cream is Not Only for Toddlers

I created a shave cream play area by placing a small plastic mat on the floor (you could use a plastic tablecloth) and providing some cookie sheets as palettes. My preschooler enjoyed the sensory experience and even skating in it on the mat! (Be cautious-he fell down quite a bit, but loved it!) I also provided one of his letter tracing sheets in a plastic baggie so that he could use the shaving cream and his finger to trace the letters. Something to break up the play anyway. He preferred getting his hands and feet in it-it was a hit! I did plan this on a day when I had to mop the floors anyway, so it was too much extra clean up, but it was easy to clean up and wash off.

Mixed-Up Letter Magnets
For an older preschooler who has mastered their alphabet and its order, try changing things up and checking their mastery of their letters. I created a simple mixed-up letter mat and taped it to the fridge so that my son could match the letter magnets to the letters, but could not rely on singing the ABC song or reciting the traditional order to solve the puzzle. This makes the letters fresh for a child who has seen them on the front of  the fridge for 3 or 4 years running!

Simple Bean Bag Game
 Using the homemade bean bags I shared in my previous post Make Your Own Bean Bags, I created a simple toss game to use them. On an empty cardboard box, I wrote '5' on the flaps and '10' on the bottom of the inside of the box. I placed a couple pieces of rolled masking tape to the bottom of the box to help secure it to the floor-you could use double stick tape as well. About 3-4 feet away, I placed a strip of masking tape on the floor to mark the location to stand when tossing. My son stood with his toes on the line and tossed the bean bag towards the box. If the bean bag hit a flap we wrote down '5' points and if the bag landed in the box he gained '10'. I wrote the numbers on our chalk board so he could see the numbers and when we were done (you can toss as many times as you'd like) we counted by 5's and 10's to add up the numbers for a total score. Math, gross motor, eye-hand coordination, taking turns, and fun!

Magnifying Glass Book Hunt

My son created this activity on his own. He was exploring using a magnifying glass and started looking through a book with it, highlighting different images and letters. He was telling me what he was seeing through the lens and I thought it was a great way to create a scavenger hunt from a book! We read and read and read the same books over and again-I am sure you do too-so this is a nice way to still explore favorite books while looking at them in a new way. Tell your child to use the magnifying glass (you can find them at the Dollar Store) to find a specific letter, or part of the illustration. With older children you can point to a word, read it out loud, and then ask your child to locate part of the illustration that matches. Ask younger ones to find colors, animals, or other objects.

One-to-One Number Plates

Using paper plates (we shop at Costco, so we have about 500 paper plates at any given time in our house), I wrote a number symbol, number word and circles to show each amount represented by each number. My son had a collection of rocks, and I thought this would be a great way to allow him to use them in the house for a productive activity. I pointed to the number and read the word; he had to fill in the circles on each plate with rocks to show how many each number represented. This is great and simple for teaching one-to-one correspondence, counting, and number recognition. You could use acorns, marbles, cheerios, or cut out construction paper circles.


Alphabet Picture Poster
Letter recognition and pre-reading is so easily taught at home. We had some large pieces of brown paper stored and I decided to engage both my preschooler and my toddler in making this poster of the alphabet to hang on our playroom/office wall. We sang the alphabet while I wrote each letter set (upper and lower case together in this project) so that we were reinforcing the mnemonic device that is the alphabet song, teaching the letters to my toddler, and allowing my son to lead the way since he knows his letters. Below each letter set, we worked together to think of a picture that began with each letter. (This poster was not completed in one day. We started it before dinner one afternoon and finished it the next morning after breakfast. It is ok to allow projects to span some time and not necessarily complete them in one sitting.) My artistic skills are not great, but we created simple enough designs that the letters were reinforced. My son can associate the letters  and the pictures while my daughter can point to the pictures and say their 'name' (i.e. 'baby' under the letters 'B' and 'b').

This can be expanded a step further if you write the actual word below each picture to create even more print awareness. In addition, you could cut this poster apart (cut the letters, pictures and words into separate 'flash cards' so to speak) and use them as cards to match each letter with object that begins with that letter and the matching word for each object. This would be a great way to get another activity from the poster when it begins to not get noticed after being up on the wall for a time. 


Picture-Letter Sound Match

This activity is so easy to put together! First off, write each letter of the alphabet on a piece of paper. (I chose to write upper and lower case together to teach both).  Second, search on-line clip art sites, or your own stored clip art for pictures that start with each letter of the alphabet. I printed off one picture per letter. After cutting the pictures apart I laminated them and the letter sheet. Your child can say the name of the item pictured and match it to the letter that starts its name, for example, the parrot picture will match with the letter 'p' since parrot starts with 'p'. Work with your child if they find this challenging at first-my son definitely needed my help for the first 1-2 times he 'played' with this. After that he figured out the process and had gained enough knowledge to complete it on his own.  (You certainly do not need to laminate these pieces. I found an inexpensive laminator at Costco. Use clear contact paper or clear packaging tape to help this game last.)

Restaurant Menu Search

When we were eating breakfast at a local chain restaurant, my son finished eating before the rest of my family and was very eager to "get going" as he likes to say. Using the restaurant's children's menu, in between my bites of food, I had my son search out letters, food items, and colors in his menu to keep him engaged while the rest of us finished our meal. If you bring along other activities to keep your child occupied while in a restaurant, try bringing the menu home and utilizing it at a later time as a game.


Alphabet Order
We all have those letter magnets for the fridge (if you don't, you can find them in the dollar aisle at Wal-Mart or you can make them out of milk caps with a strip of magnet on the back-check out the FB page for this idea). Our magnets are not often in a nice organized order on the front of the fridge, so make an activity out of it: your child can sing the "ABC song" while placing the magnets in the correct order. If your child needs some help with this, write the alphabet in order on a piece of paper and tape it to the fridge so that your child can learn the order by matching each magnet to the written letter on the paper. You are teaching a mnemonic device with this-that is a little mind trick for memorizing. ABCs and problem solving in one activity!



Copy and Stick: Make a Word
I often walk through the Target dollar aisle scanning for items that I can use in creating activities. I found some alphabet stickers (which can get a little pricey at the scrapbooking or craft store) so I scooped up a bunch for this game: your child makes words with stickers.

On a piece of paper, I wrote a few common words that we say in our house. I created a little chart as shown in the picture and my son was to make the word using the stickers on the right side of the chart.  I used upper case and lower case letters, but you can use whatever case matches the stickers if your child is still learning to differentiate between the two.


The other option is to have your child place the stickers right over the letters you wrote (as shown below). If you have a word wall in your home, this would be a fun way to increase the awareness of the words. Use your child's name or the names of family members as well. There are a lot of ways to make this meet the developmental level of your child.



Centers
Sometimes called 'centers' and sometimes called 'stations', this is just multiple activities that your child is directed to complete one after the other. I use centers when I need to take a shower while my oldest is awake and my youngest is napping. I set a few "learning games" on the dining room table, and let my son know he needs to complete all three, for example, before going back to playing. I tell him to pick one to start and then point to the other two explaining what he needs to do at each center. These would be games that he had seen before but still needed to master. (Don't use new games that you have not introduced yet.) The ones I use are the ones listed on this page. Set them at three different spots at the table, and your child moves from chair to chair to complete the centers you have set out. This would even be good when you have to make a phone call and need a few minutes of quiet, so try it out!



Frog Pond Sort
A Dollar Store cookie sheet becomes a versatile letter sound sorting game!

What you need: Construction paper, clear contact paper, cookie sheet, clip art images, magnet tape, marker, scissors.

A.) Cut a pond out of blue paper, and lily pad shapes out of green paper. On the bottom of a cookie sheet, affix the pond cutout by centering the pond on the pan and covering it with clear contact paper. The contact paper should be cut larger than the pond.

B.) Write one letter on each lily pad cutout. Cover each with contact paper or laminate, and place a small piece of magnet tape on the back of each lily pad.



C.) Print off different clip art images that begin with each letter of the alphabet-about 5 images per letter. Trim them and cover with contact paper or laminate. Also place a small piece of magnet on the back of each image. They can be stored on the top of the cookie sheet when not in use.



D.) Place a lily pad in the center of the pond. Your child then places images that start with that letter sound in the pond. Images that start with other letters stay out of the pond. Switch letter lily pads and repeat to learn all of the letter sounds.




 Personalized Songs
Check out this post with a couple of songs that your preschooler will learn from and love:
http://www.thestay-at-home-momsurvivalguide.com/2011/12/two-songs.html


Egg Carton Number Identification

Craft sticks and an egg carton (ok, and a marker) are all you need to make this math game. With an egg carton closed, turn it upside down and carefully cut out the bottom of each egg cup. I used a craft knife, but scissors will work. Write a number on each cup, from 1-12, as shown in the picture.  If you have an 18-egg carton, number up to 18.

On craft sticks draw dots for each number symbol. On the stick for '1', draw one dot. On the stick for '5', draw five dots, etc. You can also write the number symbols (1, 2, 3, etc.), or number words (one, two, three) depending on what your child is learning. If you would like to expand on this for a child already learning addition or subtraction, check out the adaptation on the Early Elementary Activities page. The photo below gives you a little hint!




Color Word Spelling
It is amazing how quickly children start reading-if you haven't noticed it yet, you will, when your child sees a piece of mail and says, "That says Geico," or when you are driving down the road and they point to the grocery store because they see the picture or words that are associated with the building. I like to encourage reading in ways that my child will not even recognize. He thinks he is building something, yet he is being exposed to reading and building up a word bank for when he will begin writing sentences.  Here is an activity that (like most of mine) can be adapted to fit your needs:
Using an index card, fold the card in half and tape or staple the sides to form a pocket. Write a color word on each pocket with the corresponding color of crayon or marker to help develop the associations between the color and word.


On craft sticks, write the letters to spell each color word. Write one letter on each stick until you have every letter for each word.

To complete the activity, your child will place the sticks into the pocket lining up the letters to form or spell each color word. This activity will bridge skill levels since it is basically a one-to-one correspondence activity of matching a stick to a letter. Be sure to read and use your finger to underline each color word as you say it when you introduce this activity to your child. Tracing a finger under a word (even when reading to toddlers) helps provide them with the knowledge of which word is 'saying' what. 


Make-at-Home Letter Tiles
You can find sets of letter tiles on Amazon, in book orders, and at teacher supply stores, but you can make your own to help your child begin to make words. Using milk caps, clean them and when dry write one letter on the inside of each cap with a permanent marker. (I posted this idea in my Quick tips album on Facebook a while back-you can place a piece of magnetic tape on the back of each of these 'tiles' to make your own magnetic letters as well. This is a nice option if you are missing some of the magnetic letters on the front of the fridge.) Read on for two letter tile spelling activities.


DVD Case-Word Family Spelling
 If you've viewed my Pinterest boards, you may have seen the DVD case activities.  Here is a way to expand on them to work on constructing words in a concrete, fun way. Have your child spell the words in the DVD case using letter tiles directions for homemade ones are above). Encourage them to sound out the first letter and the ending to begin noticing the pattern of the words in the case. This is where the homemade letter tiles can come in handy: many letter tile sets may not have enough letters to allow all the words in the case to be spelled at the same time, so if you make your own set, you can make enough to spell all the words.


Dollar Store Flashcards Spelling

I don't know many moms who dislike the Dollar Store! There is always an array of activities that can be made from simple Dollar Store finds. Here is one you may want to try:

Using letter tiles (yep, again) and a package of flashcards that you can find at the Dollar Store, have your child spell out words on the flashcards. This is a fun hands-on-non-paper-and-pencil way to get your child learning about constructing words and using print to gain information. When the words are constructed, read them together or have your child read them to you depending on their skill level.


A homemade scale-in 3 steps-to explore 'heavy', 'light', heaviest' and 'lightest'.

Parking Lot Word Mat
My son LOVES cars. It started when he was 1 and has continued. Here is a little game for encouraging those car-lovers (often boys, but not exclusively) to read and learn.

Step 1) Using colored paper, make 'labels' for the vehicles you want to play with.

Step 2) Tape the labels to a piece of black construction paper. We used a few pieces of paper to make a long parking lot so multiple cars could be played with, but for younger ones, use just a few. Leave spaces in between each label and using a white pencil or correction tape (pictured) draw lines like you would find on a parking lot between each label.



Step 3) Laminate the pieces of paper, if desired. Then tape the pieces of black paper together along their short sides using packing tape. If desired you can trim the mat before laminating.



 Step 4) Help your child read the labels to correctly park the cars on the 'lot'.




Body Trace
Both of my kiddos enjoy The Magic School Bus books and anything about their bodies. Often when I was teaching preschool, I had the children do a body trace, so we tried it at home. My son wanted to trace his little sister, and I touched up his work and traced him on a long piece of butcher paper.

We started by just tracing the outline of their bodies. They decorated and drew on them and we hung them on the wall. It was fun to compare their body sizes to each other. As we read more about the body, skeleton, and organs, my son asked to draw the bones on his body trace, so I started some and he drew bits based on a book we have that shows the skeleton.  Another time we read about the heart and I tried to the best of my ability to draw a heart so he could place his heart on his body trace...there are endless levels of learning that can happen with this from really simple to more complex with older kids. (This spanned different days and many different moments, so it is an activity that can be revisited over time.) I folded up their body tracings and placed them in the file of saved work I keep for each of them so we can look back and remember what size they were as they grow. A nice keepsake as well!




Writing Tip for where to start and where to stop
If you write with a highlighter on a piece of paper, your child can trace over your guide to practice. Sometimes they need a little help with where to start and where to stop when you have to attend to other children or tasks. I tried this one time and it helped. Using colored pencils, crayons or markers, place a green dot at the point of the number or letter where your child needs to start writing and place a red dot at the end where they stop and lift their pencil. It's a nice visual guide for writing practice.


Stale Bread and Hammers
We happened to have a bunch of stale bread at one point and I just can not throw it away, so I asked my children if they wanted to make bread crumbs to feed to the birds. That is what we did, but a regular utensil could not break the bread apart. What child doesn't like the opportunity to bang? We got out the hammers.

I placed a piece of stale bread on a paper plate, my children then banged on it with a hammer until it was broken into small enough pieces. We scattered the pieces on the ground and tried to keep our dog from eating them! It was a fun activity. Now to resist the urge to let the bread go stale so we can do it again!


Pizza Box Race Track

Wipe out an empty pizza box to clear the crumbs and some of the leftover oils. My son took over on drawing in the track (like on NASCAR) with a black crayon, but you could tape or glue on pieces of black paper. We added some green paper in the middle and some smaller pieces to make "pit stalls". That was it. About 10 minutes and a portable race track was made! Cars can even store away inside it. Add more details if your child likes.



Duct Tape (or any other kind of tape) Pictures
Doesn't get easier: Rip off pieces of tape and place them in the edge of a table. Your child picks them up as needed and created a picture. My son said his was an "alien", so I told him the letters to write out the word on his paper. Any piece of children's art work can create a story. Ask them to tell you about their picture, and write it down. Read it back to them so they connect their spoken word with the print. 

Number Order

As easy as the title says. Write numbers on index cards or small squares of paper. Give them to your child out of order, and let them order the numbers. This activity not only helps your child develop number recognition, understanding of number order, but also allows them to problem solve by counting up or counting down. (An extension activity would be to reverse the order and have your child place the numbers in order from greatest to least. A little extra practice.)

Nuts and Bolts Fine Motor Match

At your local hardware store, pick up a few of the screw-nut combination packages. You can find them near the nails, screws, carriage bolts, etc. I bought a few different packages (of screws of differing sizes) so that I could mix them for this game. My son enjoyed trying to match the nut to the screw and screwing it all the way up. It's a matching game of visual discrimination and trial-and-error as well as a great fine motor exercise. (It keeps him very busy for a bit too!)

Shave Cream Texture Painting

By mixing together shave cream, glue, and food coloring, I created two different colored shave cream piles. I placed a cookie sheet on the table for a work space and provided different paint scrapers to add texture. If you don't have paint scrapers, use sporks from a take out restaurant, or spoons, forks and butter knives. My child scooped some of each color onto his paper and scraped it across to add lines and texture as well as to mix the colors.

Because the shave cream-glue mixture stands up more than regular paint, the ridges are pretty interesting when dry. A science observation can occur after, as well, since the colors change a bit once the piece is dried. This is very easy to clean up too!



Playdough Cutting Practice
Basic skills can often be worked into fun activities, like cutting with a knife, as an example. Using a child-sized knife or a butter knife show your child how to cut a piece of playdough with it. (No large knives with really sharp blades, please!!) For younger ones, use a ruler on its edge as a cutting tool-until you are comfortable with your child using a butter knife.

Grocery Flyer Scavenger Hunt
Children can be exposed to literacy in ways other than reading books (although many, many books should be read over and over again). Using the grocery store flyers that you get in the newspaper, or even at the store, create a scavenger hunt. I provide my child with a writing utensil-marker or crayon work best-, but pencils may be dark enough to show up on the newsprint as well. Ask them to find specific items like apples, crackers, or ask more vague questions like, "Look for a brown item," or "Look for something square."  If your child can identify letters and/or numbers, ask them to circle specific letters, or numbers. It is one more way to reuse these items before they head into the recycling bin.

'Tens' Bags to Make One Hundred
The number '100' can be hard to comprehend for young children, but this activity makes it a bit more concrete. Using any items that you have in your home, collect 10 items and place them in a baggie. Repeat this for a total of ten baggies. The items in each bag can be the same or you can find a different item for each bag as long as the items in one bag are the same. We used rose petals. Each bag contains 10 petals and we filled 10 bags in total. It is introductory for this age group to explore counting in this way, but it is an exploration that can be interesting for them.  You could put 10 paper clips in one bag, 10 goldfish crackers in another, 10 pom poms in another, etc. A scavenger hunt will ensue just trying to find the items to place in the bags-another layer of fun!


Number Writing


Using the number cards from other activities I have posted here, I created a writing activity. I picked random number cards from the baggie that they are stored in and wrote the number name on a lined piece of paper using a highlighter marker. My preschooler then traced each word and I underlined the number word with my finger as I said it to reinforce the spoken-written connection. He then wrote the number above each number word. You can use whatever numbers your child is comfortable with or numbers that he/she needs to work on identifying. It's a great way to bridge math and writing.

Alphabet Poster Puzzle

In activity #53 above, my children and I created an alphabet poster to hang on our playroom wall. After it became less noticed, I took it down and cut it in to individual letter squares so it could be used as a puzzle. My preschooler takes the cards out and tries to place them in alphabetical order. Sometimes he had to sing the ABC song to help determine which letter went where, but that is problem solving.


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146 comments:

  1. These are AMAZING ideas! I can't wait to try them out with my daughter. Thank you!

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    1. I am so glad that you found some that you can use in your home. Some take a few minutes to create, but they last for a while so you can change them out with others to maintain interest and maximize the time it takes you to create them. Enjoy your daughter and thank you for the kind words.

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    2. FANTASTIC!!!! :) Thanks for sharing with everyone~so helpful!

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    1. Thanks, Lanna! I appreciate that. It is good to know that you think they are helpful. :)

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  3. Wonderful! I taught pre-school and kindergarten and yet I never think to do these things at home. Thanks

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    1. Thanks for your nice comment. I completely understand how when we switch to "mom" we tend to focus on the house and daily chores. I do try to make the effort to focus on teaching them here at home, but I have days too where I get bogged down with household tasks. It's the nature of the job, I think. Using our teaching background is so helpful to keep our interest, benefit our children and not waste the lessons we learned. It is pretty rewarding to teach my own children, I do have to say! I hope you enjoy sharing your skills with your own child(ren)!

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  4. Great ideas! Thanks for sharing. Hoping to do a few activities a day.

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    1. Thank you, Summer! I am so glad that you found a few that will be fun to try in your home.

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    1. Thanks, Tiffany! I hope you found some that you can use.

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  6. I just found these ideas today and I'm really excited to try some with my three year old. I'm a SAHM and I feel like he's just not interested in the learning books anymore. We tired 37. Cotton swab writing and he really enjoyed and stayed focused with it. Thanks!!

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    1. Courtney, I am so glad to hear that! There is so much learning that takes place every day that we are often unaware of-it is not always sit-down lessons that impart the greatest knowledge. Hopefully these more open-ended activities that touch on multiple skills at one time will help maintain his interest for a bit. When my son was three we had to definitely make sure he was getting a lot of outdoor time in order for him to be relaxed and ready to sit for an activity or two. Some days we can get through a bunch, and some days one is almost too much for him to handle. I think patience is so important. Best to you!

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  7. Awesome ideas , I teach kindergarten so many of these ideas will be used at home and in my classroom :-)

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    1. That is great news! I wish you all the best as you teach our youth AND raise your own. Thank you for your kind comment.

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  8. I just came across your blog via Pinterest. I am so thankful for your easy, cheap, educational, and FUN ideas! My son just turned 3 and I am a former kindergarten teacher but this is my first year of being a stay-at-home-mom! I am so excited to be home with my son and thankful for all your ideas! When he wakes up from his nap we are going to get right on the numbers and stickers activity! He LOVES stickers so this will be perfect! Thanks again!

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    1. Erin, congratulations on being able to stay home! I hope you enjoy the time with your child. I really appreciate you commenting and sharing such kind thoughts about the activities.

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  9. These are great! I have a baby about to turn 1, is there a list of ideas for babies/younger toddlers? :)

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    1. April, at the top of this page are all of the links to the other age groups-there is a page just for Infants! Here is the link as well: http://thestay-at-home-momsurvivalguide.blogspot.com/p/infant-activities.html. I am so glad that you have found these lists and let me know if some of the infant ideas work for you. I appreciate you commenting!

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  10. Just found your website on Pinterest. What great ideas. Thanks for sharing. I am working on a list of things to do next week with the kids. I love these types of actives. Take Care

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    1. Thank you, Tiffany! I am so glad to hear that you are going to try some. I hope it all goes well. All the best to you!

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  11. These are so many great ideas I hope to use this year with my two youngest. Thanks for sharing! (Found you on pinterest, btw.)

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    1. Shannon, thanks for letting me know that you found me on Pinterest! I appreciate your kind comment and am so glad that you have found a few activities that you can use in your home. Take care!

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  12. I absolutely LOVE this list!!! Thanks so much for sharing! With a 5, 3, and almost 2 year old, I need all the help I can get keeping them busy around the house! :)

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    1. Brianne, I bet your three kiddos are keeping you very busy! What great experience and mom-knowledge you have to share. Thank you for the wonderful compliment on this list. I am so glad that you have found some that you can share with your children.

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  13. Thank you so much for sharing these ideas!!! I have a four year okd who doesnt like to trace!! She is going to love the qtip trace....hopefully! LOL she loves to paint!

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    1. Amy, I sure do hope she enjoys 'tracing' when combined with painting that she loves! Let me know how it goes. I appreciate you taking the time to comment here. All the best to you!

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  14. These are such wonderful creative ideas! I'm always looking for new, fun ways to teach my kids reading and writing and this is great! Thanks so much for sharing!!

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    1. Kaila, thank you for your nice comment. I really appreciate hearing that the ideas are being received well. I am so glad that you have found some ideas to use in your home. All the best to you and your family!

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    2. I just stumbled across your blog. Thank you. I run a daycare and I create my own things for my children and it gets hard coming up with new ideas. I am looking forward to trying some of yours.

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    3. LeAnn, I am so glad that you can use them. Thanks for commenting. All the best to you as you provide care to those kiddos!

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  15. I worked as a literacy teacher for four years and am now a SAHM. You have some awesome ideas that I can't wait to try with my 3 year old! Thanks so much!

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    1. I am so glad to know you were a teacher! Thanks for stopping by and leaving such a nice comment. I appreciate that. All the best to you as you get to stay home and teach your own child now!

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  16. I am blown away by the simplicity of these projects! I taught children with special needs for 5 years and found that hands on projects children are able to do with minimal guidance are the best! These activities are just that! I am so excited to try them with my 3 1/2 yr old son and 1 1/2 yr old daughter! I can see that my son will be able to get the learning objective while my daughter will have fun playing along! Thanks for the inspiration :)







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    1. They definitely are simple and very frugal. I think that is a key combo for one-income households such as mine and any household that lives according to a budget. I am so glad that you found a few ideas you can use with your own little ones! Many of the activities posted are able to be enjoyed by multiple age groups or easily adapted to accommodate specific developmental needs-I am sure you are a pro at that with all of your experience! I appreciate you taking the time to comment here and share.

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  17. These are really great! Thank You. My son was upset that hes not going to preschool and these are perfect so I can bring school to him. :)

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    1. Thank YOU for that nice comment. I am so glad to read that they will be useful to you at home with your son. My son had to wait a while to be allowed to go to preschool-frankly, I think children learn more at home anyway-so your son will not be missing anything. All the best to you as you teach him at home! Enjoy!

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  18. Do you have a button that I can put on my blog? (busyandthebeans.blogspot.com) I love your ideas and want to uses them with my kids and always like to give credit where credit is due :)

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    1. Tracy, as soon as I create one I will let you know. (It's on my list.) Thanks for asking!

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  19. Thank you for taking the time to share your creative ideas. My son is 2, but recently seems bored and restless with our usual activities. This has given me so many ideas to challenge him and keep learning fun. I will be referring back to this post often, and will check out a few more of your blogposts.

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    1. Nicki, I am so glad to hear that you have found some ideas that you can use. Challenging children is so important to keep them engaged in learning and really growing to meet their own potential. Developmental stages are so fluid and, as you are finding, just because your son is 2 does not mean that his brain is still in 'toddler mode' when it comes to exploring. Good for you for trying to offer him more activities to keep him interested in learning and playing. All the best!

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  20. Thank you for taking the time to put together this great list. With my 4 year old in preschool most days I was looking for more ideas of things to do with her younger brother. Thanks I think we will be doing several tomorrow!

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    1. That is great news! Thanks for sharing. It is so nice to know that these ideas are useful for others.

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  21. Hi! I could never figure out creative ways to use stickers! So thanks! Your blog will be useful for all of my little ones who are 7 months, 18 months and 3 1/2 years.

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    1. You can utilize each of the activity pages with your crew! I am so glad to read that you have found ideas you can use in your own home. Enjoy your children!

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  22. I am so glad that I found your blog! I am a sahm of two boys (4 and 2). I have been looking for ways to do play-based learning. Currently I am home alone with the boys because my husband is deployed, and I really think these activities will be great for my sanity as well! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I am glad that you found it too! Thanks for sharing your thoughts. As a military spouse, I know it's important to keep the day moving along so we don't get in that crazy zone of feeling the days drag-even if it may be inevitable. I hope that these quick, simple activities can help keep the kids engaged and you teaching them to be beneficial to you both. All the best to you and I will be thinking about you while you take on this deployment!

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  23. I really love your ideas, there simple and don't cost anything. I will be doing this tomorrow with my 3 year old who is always ready to learn and have fun at the same time. Thanks alot it really helps us stay at home mothers who want to keep our little ones interested in learning.

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    1. Brittany, thank YOU! I am so glad to read this. Happy learning and teaching with your child!

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  24. I always pin lots of blogs like this since I am a stay at home mom with no creativity. I have to say those this is the best ideas I have ever seen. They are great games that can really grow with your child.

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    1. Thank you so much for THAT awesome compliment! I really appreciate it. I agree with you that most of the activities that I have posted for all the age groups can be easily adapted to learning styles and developmental need. Simple is usually best in my opinion. I am so glad you have found some ideas that will be helpful to you.

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  25. Thanks so much for these great ideas! I am a Speech Therapist and I used to work in the schools but now I do home-based therapy. I work with several preschool age kiddos which is new to me. I am constantly struggling for new ideas that will keep these little guys interested. These activities are great and I cannot wait to start using them during my therapy sessions! :) you rock!

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    1. Well, I think you rock for working with children and especially in therapy! What a service you provide to those kiddos and their families. I truly appreciate your kind words about this site. It makes me feel that it is all worth it.

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  26. Wonderful! I have been teaching for a long time and have three children of my own...this is a GREAT collection of some favorite activities, and some new ones I have not seen/tried. Yes, even teachers have brain farts and can't think of anything interesting to do with their children!
    Will be sharing on my personal and professional pinterest board! Wishing you lots of traffic! Well done.

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    1. Great! As a former teacher, I know that feeling of trying to find something new, but wanting it to be a great teaching tool. I am so glad you will be sharing. I appreciate that. All the best to you!

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  27. Omg this is amazing I was at my wits end trying to figure out how to entertain my 3 yr old without her sitting in front of the TV all day I am soooooo gonna try these staring today. I love it!!!!!!!!!! Thanks a lot

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    1. Great to know! I am so glad that these will be helpful. All the best to you and your family!

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  28. You have so many creative ideas here! I can't believe this is all one blog post-- you really ought to make this all into an ebook or printed book! Good photos and the activities look very doable, educational, and fun!

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    1. Thank you, Diane! I am working on it. :) Two busy kids keep my focus most of the time, but I do have plans in the works for some off-shoot products from this list. I appreciate your encouragement and suggestion. This list is a work-in-progress and there is much more to come from this site. Take care!

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    1. Kristin, I appreciate that nice compliment. So glad that you can use some of these in your home. All the best!

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  30. So appreciative of the time and effort you put into this....the ideas are wonderful!!

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    1. Thanks so much, Sarah. It is nice to get feedback like your commeny so I know that the effort is well worth it. I am so glad to know that so many moms can use these ideas. Take care!

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  31. How excited I am to find this! I am home with my four year old and have been struggling to get him interested in learning his lettersand numbers. these ideas may just sneak the learning in on him ! Thanks so much!

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    1. I certainly hope they do! You are very welcome. Thank you for the nice comment and all the best to you as you sneak in that learning.

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    2. So it's not just my kid? LOL My son will be 4 soon and he hates working on letters and numbers! I have so many things I'm working with, but am constantly looking for new suggestions!

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  32. Thanks for all the wonderful ideas! I have 3 boys ages 5, 3 and 1. I engaged my oldest non-stop, but have been lazier (well, busy really!) with the second. It was so nice to be inspired again! :) Gillian

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    1. Yes, I completely understand how when going from the first to the second there is less time with the second child. You will be a pro now with three! I am glad that these ideas offered some inspiration and I wish you well.

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  33. really excited to try these..i have an almost 4 yr old and i watch my friends daughter who's the same age, once a week and have been looking for things for them to do that are fun but that they can learn from.
    thank you for So Many Great ideas

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    1. These should keep them busy and learning, for sure! I am glad to know you can use them. Thank you so much for the nice comment!

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  34. Just a suggestion: For things like tracing letters, circling objects, mazes and the like where my son will be writing on the paper AND I plan to use it more than once---I print one copy (or tear the page out of the workbook) and laminate it. Then I just have him use washable or dry-erase markers and I can use the same page forever. This has saved me a ton! I also laminate things I plan to cut into cards (so they last longer) and, of course, I laminate my son's artwork!

    If you don't want to invest in a laminator you can use zipper bags for a dry-erase/washable surface. BTW, before I got the laminator I would scan pages from workbooks into the computer so that I can re-print them rather than have to buy another book.

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  35. Amazing ideas and SO creative (which I lack). My son is only 10 months but ive already bookedmarked this to use when he gets older! Any suggestions on thjngs I could be working with him now on?

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    1. I am glad that you found some ideas that you would like to try as your son grows. For now, check out the Infant Activities page: http://www.thestay-at-home-momsurvivalguide.com/p/infant-activities.html and the Toddler Activities page: http://www.thestay-at-home-momsurvivalguide.com/p/toddler-activities.html. Your son is right in between the two stages, so check out both and you may get some more age-appropriate activity ideas to use right now. Take care and enjoy!

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  36. Amazing ideas and SO creative (which I lack). My son is only 10 months but ive already bookedmarked this to use when he gets older! Any suggestions on thjngs I could be working with him now on?

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  37. I have a question about something that I'm dealing with and I would love to get your opinion on it. Well, My son is 3 years old and he is the only child and preschool is an option for him..We are on a waiting list for him to get into preschool where we live and time is TICKING..So me and my husband agreed to just pay for him to go to preschool which is $150.00 a week. They have a preschool curriculum for them to follow to prepare them for kindergarten. As I am going over the finances I'm questioning can we even afford it since I'm a SAHM and my husband is the only one working and I have 3 major school loans to pay off. We both agreed that we want him around other kids because I know that is what our son wants since he is the only child. Now we are debating should we only enroll him in preschool part time which is 80.00 a week attending 3 days a week and the other days that he isn't in school just home school him. My sister she didn't go to preschool at all she didn't go to until she was as the kindergarten age and my Stepmom did preschool activities at home with her full time. What is your advice? You can email me at dowhatulove365@gmail.com , My blog is http://introvertentrepreneurialdiva.wordpress.com...sorry this is so long

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    1. Hi Shari, don't worry about the length of your comment, I am happy to read it and respond. I will email this to you as well just in case it's easier for you to get it there, but will leave this up here as well in case other parents have the same concern.

      Considering the finances is SO important. You are smart to be looking at your home budget. I think preschool for 3 and 4 year olds is completely optional. It is not required to prepare a child for Kindergarten if you are teaching them letters, numbers, gross motor skills (throwing, catching, running, skipping, hopping) and reading them books every day. I do think at 3-4 years old it is important for children to play and interact with other children and attend events where they have to listen to directions from other adults. This can be done in playgroups, family events if you have nieces and nephews, neighborhood playtime, or library storytime-type-events. Children do not NEED to go to preschool.

      If you really think that your budget is going to be tight with full-week preschool, consider a part time schedule. I send my 4 1/2 year old 3 mornings a week, but it is $200 per month. They do a great job, but my son learned a lot at home prior to starting preK and he did not go until he was 4. I think it's best that children wait to enter 'school environments' until they are fully potty trained, and at least 3 years old. I know not everyone can do that, but it's hard when preschool teachers are trying to teach and still getting interrupted by potty training.

      If I were you I would look at the 3-day option, and even half days instead of full days if that is offered. Next year your child will be in school full days, so you both will get a lot less time together. You teaching him at home doing activities like the ones I have posted on this site will supplement Preschool and prepare him for Kindergarten. If you decide that you have storytime events and family events, etc. that give your child enough interaction with other children, then you could even skip preschool. I don't know your child and his skill level right now, but there are developmental checklists available that you can use to guide what he will need to know for Kindergarten. I have one that I have used linked in this post:

      http://www.thestay-at-home-momsurvivalguide.com/2011/09/1st-post-redux-from-facebook.html

      I will be updating that page to include an actual Preschool assessment that I used to use for my preschoolers when I was teaching to be sure they were ready for Kindergarten. I hope some of this can help. Let me know what else I can do! Best to you and your family!

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  38. Some ideas really excellent and its can be apply at home or school.

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    1. They are very easy to do in the home or in a classroom. I was originally a teacher, so my classroom roots come out with my kids at home. Thank you for sharing!

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  39. These are awesome ideas. Even with an early childhood masters degree, I sometimes have trouble thinking of other things to do during the day. I can't wait to find time to make some of the activities...first I have to find my laminator!

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    1. Thanks so much for the nice compliment! I am glad that you think they will be helpful. Sounds like you have a lot of beneficial education to draw from and I am sure it comes in very handy. Enjoy the activities and thank so much for sharing your thoughts! Good luck finding the laminator. :)

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  40. So many fun activities on this page. You are very creative in making fun activities with your children. So much to teach our children, and teaching them things in a fun way is fantastic.

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    1. Hi Carolyn, thanks so much! Teaching and fun are great partners. Thanks for stopping by.

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  41. I am a preschool teacher and I love finding new and exciting ways to engage my children. Great ideas!!!

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    1. Great! I am so glad to hear that there are some new ones here that look interesting. Thanks for sharing and thank you for teaching little ones! All the best.

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  42. This is awesome! I have 2 of my own and 2 foster kiddos (5yrs, 3yrs and two 2yr olds!) that will LOVE these activities.

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    1. Kelly, YOU are awesome for taking on service in your life with your two and your two foster kids! It is the best comment for me to read that the kids will like the activities-that is the ultimate! I am so glad you stopped by and shared. Take care and thank you for all you are doing for your family!

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  43. these are awesome ideas cant wait to try them with my son. i think he will have lots of fun with them .

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    1. I hope you and your son do have fun with them!

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  44. obxdoodlebug4/04/2013 9:57 AM

    Just found this site today and you have done an amazing job! Thank you so much for taking the time to post so many ideas. Can't wait to start using them with my great grandson this summer as i will have him each day. so many ideas.

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    1. Thank you for the nice comment! I appreciate it. Enjoy the time you will have with your grandson-what a lucky guy to have such a caring grandma! Take care!

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  45. Thank you so much for all this valuable information you've shared. The kids are benefiting so much. We've always drawn, playdoughed, played outdoors etc but I was really starting to worry about my 3 year old getting bored with her 1 year old brother; now we've got lots planned. Thanks again. :)

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  46. AWESOME ideas :) Thanks so much for sharing them

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  47. Thank you for posting your activities and not a regurgitation of Pinterest pics!

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    1. Ha ha! I hear ya. You are very welcome. These come from my own bins of activities from when I was teaching and from my own home when I create activities to use with my kiddos, so there could be some overlap with other sites out there since there are a lot of creative mommas around the internet, but I do try to keep this list original. I am glad that that is a welcome aspect of this blog site. I appreciate you sharing!

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  48. Such a great resource! Thank you for sharing. What do you do to store all these activities?

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    1. Hi Becky, I am so glad that you can use some of these ideas in your home. Thank you for such a nice comment. I actually store each activity in a gallon-sized zip-top bag and then have two fabric bins (like you can find at Target or other stores)for each child and their games are in their bins. I will be posting about it soon to show the specifics, but here is a similar idea that I posted previously:

      http://www.thestay-at-home-momsurvivalguide.com/2011/10/easy-organization.html

      Thanks again and enjoy the time with your children!

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  49. I am a special education teacher who has decided to take a break from teaching in order to stay home with my little ones. In looking at your page, I am so very impressed and excited. A lot of these activities take place in the classroom. I am looking forward to doing these with my children! Thank you so much!

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    1. I am so excited for you and your children! Enjoy your opportunity to be home with them. Thank you for sharing such kind thoughts about this page. I appreciate the nice feedback. I will be adding more activities to this page very soon! All the best to you and your family!

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  50. love your site. such great ideas.

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  51. I came across your website, calling for help on what to do with them on the weekend in the winter.In my community we recycle a lot so I have all the materials in hand to my surprise, but never thought to take a time to figure out to use them with my kids. Most of our activities will be set up with books I buy from the stores. Then I realized I was enjoying what I was doing with my kids. With a handful of toddlers I notice that the books weren't so exited for them. I am very exited to see new ideas my kids love your creativity and I enjoy them learning so much, I have been motivated to become a teacher to see more smiling faces as they learn. God Bless an Happy Mothers Day

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    1. Carla, that is so great! Thank you for sharing with me. I wish you the best with your children and in your goal to become a teacher. Very exciting!

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  52. Thank You for this list. It is wonderful. I have to take my children with me to work quite a bit and not only are these activities for stay-at-home moms but they keep my daughter quite while I am sitting at work playing the piano. I have been esp. looking for letter and number activities and you have so many great ones to change up the ones that I have been doing.

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    1. Amalie, I am so glad to hear that they are helping out! I think that is so cool that you get to take your kids to work with you. They get to see what you do and are still under your care. Awesome! Have fun with the activities and all the best to you and your family!

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  53. Jaimi, this page is fantastic! Thanks for sharing all these ideas. We live in a very rural area, and have a corresponding lifestyle. :) I find most days I end up trying to make fun activities out of the work I have to get done (i.e., caring for animals, planting/gardnening/harvesting/cooking/canning, etc.). I know a lot of that is good for my son (3 yrs old), but I'm also very aware I'm letting some learning opportunities slip by. He's VERY bright, and could be learning more if I focused on some structured, fun and educational activities each day. However, I'm a terrible planner. I know if I don't have some sort of pre-defined schedule, I will continue to let it get away from me. Do you have or know of a printable calendar or "lesson plan" with activities such as you have suggested above? Such a tool would help me tremendously! Thanks again!

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    1. Thank you, Ginny! I am sure that with all of the activities you engage in on a daily basis your son is learning a lot! It is amazing what just doing our regular household work each day can and does teach our children. I do understand your desire to want to teach more academic skills as well. I am in the process of altering a lesson planning worksheet that I used while teaching to be more updated and conducive to the planning that a mom needs to do in a day. I did however do a search for "mom lesson plan," "homeschool lesson plan," and "daily planning template" and found so many different styles and formats. Some are broken down by hours in the day, others are just list the day of the week with a space for planning what you'd like to cover. You may want to check out white board calendar planners. That way it is reusable, you can adjust as the week progresses and everything can stay organized. I have one I purchased at Target. I hope that can at least get you moving in the direction you'd like to go, and I will get my lesson plan up and ready for free download ASAP! Thanks so much for your question and kind comments.

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  54. Jaimi, this page is fantastic! Thanks for sharing all these ideas. I can't wait to start these activities with my princess. She is so bright that i want to engage her to learn in a fun way and i found so many ideas here that i know she defenetly enjoy. Thanks a lot for creating this page . May God bless you.

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    1. Thank you so much! I am so glad to see the excitement in your words as you are eager to engage your daughter. How blessed is she to have you?! I wish you the best and may God bless you and your family as well. Have fun!

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  55. You are an AMAZING mom!

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    1. I appreciate that. I just try to learn from my mistakes and use what I can each day to engage my children. We have rough days, but many more good ones! Thanks for your kind comment.

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  56. These ideas are fantastic!! I've made two of these projects today in preparation for our new school year. Thanks so much for sharing your fabulous ideas with this homeschool newbie!

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    1. Jennifer, thank you! All the best as you begin to homeschool.

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  57. WOW! This is a great list! I just wanted to let you know that I've included your alphabet magnet game on my blog. Thanks for the post!

    Amy Senter
    http://amyroachsenter.blogspot.com/2013/08/back-to-school-toddler-games-crafts.html
    www.aspoolofthread.etsy.com

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    1. Thanks, Amy! I am so glad that more moms and/or teachers can get a glimpse and possibly try it out in their homes/classrooms. Take care!

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  58. I'm a vision therapist, and many of your activities are helpful in building visual perceptual skills. Thank you for sharing, and I love the pictures you include to explain what to do. :)

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    1. Thank you so much, Jen. I am so glad to know there is another layer of benefit to these activities. It makes me happy when people find them useful and educational. I appreciate you sharing with me.

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  59. wow this are great I'm a young mother of two and i feel really lost sometimes is not easy by myself but i know is possible and this page just gave me so much hope and motivation. Im putting it to the test right now thks for sharing this with everyone God Bless You and your family......

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    1. Yomaira, I am so glad you found this and am excited for you to get support and encouragement. That is why I do this! I appreciate you letting me know and wish you the best as you try some of these ideas out in your home.

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  60. You are amazing! I'm doing a co-op preschool with a neighbor, and this is a fabulous resource! Thank you!

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    1. Katie, that is wonderful to hear. I am so glad that you can use the activities. All the best with the co-op!

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  61. My son, diagnosed with autism and leukemia, spends a lot of time in the home. Thank you, thank you, thank you for this. I use them and am seeing progress. You are, as previously stated....amazing!

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    1. Ruby, that is high praise, and I am so thankful that the activities are working for you and are beneficial for your son! Your's might be one of my most favorite comments on this blog. YOU are amazing for caring for your son and looking for ways to enrich his life. All the best and I will be keeping you both in my prayers.

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  62. Amazing! Absolutely brilliant! I will be trying these activities at home. Thank you!

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    1. You are too kind, Brenda. I thank you for that nice comment. :) I am so glad that you will be trying some of these at home. All the best to you and your family!

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  63. This has got to be one of the best sites I've found! I'm pregnant with my second and now a stay at home mom for my four yr old son! I have gotten so many awesome ideas from this page! I don't want him to miss out on anything! I wanna prepare him for kindergarten and I'm sure that thanks to this page he will be more than prepared!

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    1. Amanda, that is great for me to read! I am so glad that the activities here will be useful in your home. You will have him prepared for Kindergarten for sure! Congrats on the pregnancy, getting to stay home, and I wish you the best with it all!

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  64. Jaimi, thank you so much!!!! As a SAHM to 2 boys, (3 and 1) and very limited income, I worried about getting my sons ready for school. I found your site 3 days ago and tried the dry erase numbers, and the name on bottle caps as I had all the materials in my house. My 3 year old loves it! And my husband and I were very happy that you shared so many great and cheap ideas to help us out. I am excited to try all the other ideas too! Thanks!!!!----------------Alini

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    1. You are so very welcome! You will be great at preparing your sons for school. I am so glad that you found this list and I look forward to posting more so that you will have many more ideas to try! All the best to you and your family!

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  65. These ideas are so great!!!!! I am constantly pinning activities but this post is perhaps one of the most comprehensive. The best part is all the activities are easy to set up, economical and utilize stuff from around the house. This would make a wonderful comprehensive hand out to give to parents for ideas at home to help preschoolers prepare for school and keep them busy. Kudos to you for one of the best blog posts I have every read for early learning (trust me I have read thousands).

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    1. That is high praise! Thank you! I do plan on eventually making a hard copy version of activities to help parents. I appreciate you stopping by and sharing!

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  66. Hi Jaimi! I absolutely love these activities, they are creative, fun and original! I praise you for thinking of these, you are a great woman! I have already started using these activities in my field placement! Thanks! - E. H.

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    1. Well that is a very kind comment! Thank you so much. I am really happy that you can use them in your field work. Enjoy your time teaching and thanks for sharing with me!

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  67. OK this is my first time commenting EVER on anything internet related but I am just so appreciative for the amazing ideas that you have taken the time to share with us. I can't wait to do some of these activities with my children your clearly a great mother I hope to be doing as good a job with my children as your doing with yours! Thanks again!

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    1. Hi, Amber! I am sure you are a great mom. We are each what our children need. I have my good days and my bad. I am so glad that you are going to try some of these activities with your children! I wish you the best with it. Enjoy your time with your children.

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  68. Thank you so much for these ideas i have three under the age of four and i was working but now im home full time and couldnt think of any new ideas thanks for being so creative i cant wait to get started

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    1. Thank you! That is great to read. Take care!

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  69. Oh, my goodness! I absolutely love these ideas! I've been a nanny for the past 5 years now and just recently started caring for new age groups, newborns to preschoolers. I have been wracking my brain trying to figure out how to keep them occupied and interested in learning new skills and fun activities. It's been a challenge considering their attention spans are so short! lol! Anyway, I appreciate it and thank you so much!

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  70. Thank you so much for this! I stay at home with my toddler. My husband and I are blessed to be able to work from home. She is special needs (a little behind on her speech and following directions) so I'm always looking for activities that will help her. I find that most activities can be modified if need be. I just love being home with her!

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    1. Jenn, that is great to hear that you can be home (both you and your husband) and attend to her needs. Thanks for stopping by! Take care.

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  71. There is a complete and impressive collection of activities for three year olds. At an age when 3 year olds are busy exploring everything around them, these exercises will help them absorb new concepts faster and better.

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    1. I have used them with my children and can agree with you that they do teach. It is so nice that simple activities can do so much to help children learn. Thanks for stopping by and sharing!

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Thank you for taking a moment to share!